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Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  17 and NAB liaison); Edward N. Nockels, WCFL, Chicago; John Kiernan, WLWL, New York; and I.Z. Buckwalter, WGAL, Lancaster. In addition to these nine, three additional federal representatives were later named to RCBA posts: 10) Harry Shaw, WMT (Waterloo, Ia.), former NAB president and state NRA official 11) William A. Farnsworth, assistant deputy NRA administrator, in charge of code negotiations. 12) Eugene O. Sykes, Federal Radio Commission. Since the temporary code authority was to remained separate from the NAB until a permanent body was named, NAB president McCosker declined to accept the chairmanship. McCosker wanted the NAB to have immediate, permanent status over the NRA codes for the radio industry, even though the NAB did not represent a majority of the nation’s stations at the time. He did not appear in an apparent act of protest at the first meeting on December 11. The same week, the Republican national committee, that generally supported all of the NAB’s so-called free market labor and business positions, began to allege publicly that the Roosevelt administration had "muzzled" U.S. radio stations in the process of trying to gain NRA compliance with the implementation of codes. In a pamphlet made public on December 7, the committee charged that it had "documentary evidence that NRA has attempted to suppress free speech and that stations have been threatened with loss of their licenses unless they censored the use of their facilities in favor of NRA." Republican officials refused to make such evidence public, until a Congressional investigation was called to investigate its charges. A probable aggravating factor here for the NAB was the decision by the head of the NRA, General Hugh Johnson, to permit continued labor union representation on all code boards (reversing his earlier opposition to them). 17 After the first round of NRA broadcast hearings, wages scales for broadcast technicians appeared to have been adjusted upward voluntarily by broadcasters to meet the continuing pressure of outside IBEW unionization threats, quell potential dissension within their own company-controlled technician unions, as well as to counter White House pressure upon the broadcast industry to set a good example in its labor relations.

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
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17
and NAB liaison); Edward N. Nockels, WCFL, Chicago; John Kiernan, WLWL, New York; and I.Z.
Buckwalter, WGAL, Lancaster.
In addition to these nine, three additional federal representatives were later named to RCBA
posts:

10) Harry Shaw, WMT (Waterloo, Ia.), former NAB president and state NRA official
11) William A. Farnsworth, assistant deputy NRA administrator, in charge of code
negotiations.
12) Eugene O. Sykes, Federal Radio Commission.
Since the temporary code authority was to remained separate from the NAB until a permanent body was
named, NAB president McCosker declined to accept the chairmanship. McCosker wanted the NAB to
have immediate, permanent status over the NRA codes for the radio industry, even though the NAB did
not represent a majority of the nation’s stations at the time. He did not appear in an apparent act of protest
at the first meeting on December 11. The same week, the Republican national committee, that generally
supported all of the NAB’s so-called free market labor and business positions, began to allege publicly
that the Roosevelt administration had "muzzled" U.S. radio stations in the process of trying to gain NRA
compliance with the implementation of codes. In a pamphlet made public on December 7, the committee
charged that it had "documentary evidence that NRA has attempted to suppress free speech and that
stations have been threatened with loss of their licenses unless they censored the use of their facilities in
favor of NRA." Republican officials refused to make such evidence public, until a Congressional
investigation was called to investigate its charges. A probable aggravating factor here for the NAB was
the decision by the head of the NRA, General Hugh Johnson, to permit continued labor union
representation on all code boards (reversing his earlier opposition to them).
17
After the first round of NRA broadcast hearings, wages scales for broadcast technicians
appeared to have been adjusted upward voluntarily by broadcasters to meet the continuing pressure of
outside IBEW unionization threats, quell potential dissension within their own company-controlled
technician unions, as well as to counter White House pressure upon the broadcast industry to set a good
example in its labor relations.


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