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Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  24 broadcasting, would continue the same wage and hour provisions as stipulated under the codes. CBS made a similar statement. Privately, however, some NBC officials were already crafting a plan to repudiate wage and hour provisions of the NRA codes. Executive vice-president R.C. Patterson, Jr. personally recommended to other NBC executives in one memo that company officials stress the network’s "voluntary cooperation" in any public mention of the defunct NRA codes. This public relations policy, Patterson said, would allow the company to back away from the NRA codes in the future without too much negative publicity. 25 The U.S. broadcast industry’s dominance would not be seriously threatened again until the Wagner Act was passed by Congress and upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1937. With the continued prospect of war abroad and the need for a rapid means to mobilize the citizenry, the White House would continue to protect broadcaster interests as previous administrations had done since the introduction of political broadcasting in 1920. Though organized labor groups would gain a foothold in broadcasting, the NAB codes would largely continue to dominate policy-making in U.S. broadcasting through a largely industry dominated Federal Communications Commission that was codified under the provisions of the Communications Act of 1934. 1 Sol Taishoff, "Commission Shakeup Seen After March 4," Broadcasting, February 15, 1933, 5; Don Craig, "Roosevelt: Perfect Broadcaster," Broadcasting, March 15, 1933, 8; Another group high on the broadcaster’s enemy list were copyright groups that earlier had demanded payment for broadcast music use such as the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP); Sol Taishoff, "’War Plans’ Laid to Protect Broadcasting," Broadcasting, March 1, 1933, 5. 2 Gary M. Walton and Hugh Rockoff, History of the American Economy, 6 th edition, New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Janoovich, 1990, 499; Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States, 2 nd edition, New York: Harper Collins, 1995, 383.A 3 For more detailed information on company unions, see the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin, 626-635, "Characteristics of Company Unions-1935," Division of Industrial Relations, Bulletin 634, June 1937 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1938), 17-18, 25, 200-202. 4 Robert W. McChesney, Telecommunications, Mass Media and Democracy: The Battle for Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928-1935 (New York: Oxford, 1993), 12-18, 147. 5 "Radio Plunges Into Recovery Campaign," Broadcasting, August 1, 1933, 5. 6 Ibid.

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
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24
broadcasting, would continue the same wage and hour provisions as stipulated under the codes. CBS
made a similar statement.
Privately, however, some NBC officials were already crafting a plan to repudiate wage and
hour provisions of the NRA codes. Executive vice-president R.C. Patterson, Jr. personally
recommended to other NBC executives in one memo that company officials stress the network’s
"voluntary cooperation" in any public mention of the defunct NRA codes. This public relations
policy, Patterson said, would allow the company to back away from the NRA codes in the future
without too much negative publicity.
25
The U.S. broadcast industry’s dominance would not be seriously threatened again until the
Wagner Act was passed by Congress and upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1937. With the continued
prospect of war abroad and the need for a rapid means to mobilize the citizenry, the White House would
continue to protect broadcaster interests as previous administrations had done since the introduction of
political broadcasting in 1920. Though organized labor groups would gain a foothold in broadcasting, the
NAB codes would largely continue to dominate policy-making in U.S. broadcasting through a largely
industry dominated Federal Communications Commission that was codified under the provisions of the
Communications Act of 1934.
1
Sol Taishoff, "Commission Shakeup Seen After March 4," Broadcasting, February 15, 1933, 5; Don Craig,
"Roosevelt: Perfect Broadcaster," Broadcasting, March 15, 1933, 8; Another group high on the broadcaster’s enemy
list were copyright groups that earlier had demanded payment for broadcast music use such as the American Society
of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP); Sol Taishoff, "’War Plans’ Laid to Protect Broadcasting,"
Broadcasting, March 1, 1933, 5.
2
Gary M. Walton and Hugh Rockoff, History of the American Economy, 6
th
edition, New York: Harcourt, Brace,
and Janoovich, 1990, 499; Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States, 2
nd
edition, New York: Harper
Collins, 1995, 383.A
3
For more detailed information on company unions, see the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin, 626-635,
"Characteristics of Company Unions-1935," Division of Industrial Relations, Bulletin 634, June 1937 (Washington,
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1938), 17-18, 25, 200-202.
4
Robert W. McChesney, Telecommunications, Mass Media and Democracy: The Battle for Control of U.S.
Broadcasting, 1928-1935 (New York: Oxford, 1993), 12-18, 147.
5
"Radio Plunges Into Recovery Campaign," Broadcasting, August 1, 1933, 5.
6
Ibid.


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