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Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  6 stations requesting information on hours of labor, wages, and employment statistics. This information was used to develop an NAB code of competition for broadcasters. It is important to note here that many in broadcasting felt that the industry should not be subject to the far-reaching powers of the NRA because broadcasting was already regulated by the FRC. However, nothing in the FRC rules or regulations dealt with the aspect of fair competition in advertising, wage minimums, or any other related economic aspects of operation. Meanwhile, NBC refused to allow its programming to be used for partisan political purposes. It followed its corporate policy of "discouraging private interests from discussing any phase of the NIRA" within any of its on-air broadcasts. This programming decision was implemented by executives to protect NBC from any political "embarrassment" or regulatory retaliation that might have resulted from anti-New Deal programming. NBC also barred the following topics of discussion: specific details of the NIRA, mentions of industry codes, methods of formulating codes, or the problems of labor. 7 By the beginning of September, the NAB said that it had organized an almost 100 percent compliance with the NRA’s proposed codes. To steer its compliance operations with the NRA, the NAB hired Washington trial lawyer John W. Guider, an associate of Duke K. Patrick, and a former general counsel of the FRC. Guider was a member of the law firm headed by Frank J. Hogan, a nationally renowned attorney specializing in radio affairs. NAB Promotes Two-Tier Work Week The NAB called together its code committee, made up of the owners and top managers of the most powerful and influential radio stations in the industry at the time. All deliberations were overseen by NAB president Alfred McCosker and the rest of the code committee (and their professional affiliations): 1) Leo J. Fitzpatrick, NAB vice-pres./WJR (CBS affiliate, Detroit). 2) John Shepard, III, NAB vice-pres./pres. Yankee Network (New England). 3) Arthur B. Church, NAB treasurer/KMBC (CBS affiliate, Kansas City).

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
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stations requesting information on hours of labor, wages, and employment statistics. This information
was used to develop an NAB code of competition for broadcasters. It is important to note here that
many in broadcasting felt that the industry should not be subject to the far-reaching powers of the NRA
because broadcasting was already regulated by the FRC. However, nothing in the FRC rules or
regulations dealt with the aspect of fair competition in advertising, wage minimums, or any other related
economic aspects of operation.
Meanwhile, NBC refused to allow its programming to be used for partisan political purposes. It
followed its corporate policy of "discouraging private interests from discussing any phase of the NIRA"
within any of its on-air broadcasts. This programming decision was implemented by executives to
protect NBC from any political "embarrassment" or regulatory retaliation that might have resulted
from anti-New Deal programming. NBC also barred the following topics of discussion: specific
details of the NIRA, mentions of industry codes, methods of formulating codes, or the problems of
labor.
7
By the beginning of September, the NAB said that it had organized an almost 100 percent
compliance with the NRA’s proposed codes. To steer its compliance operations with the NRA, the
NAB hired Washington trial lawyer John W. Guider, an associate of Duke K. Patrick, and a former
general counsel of the FRC. Guider was a member of the law firm headed by Frank J. Hogan, a
nationally renowned attorney specializing in radio affairs.
NAB Promotes Two-Tier Work Week
The NAB called together its code committee, made up of the owners and top
managers of the most powerful and influential radio stations in the industry at the time.
All deliberations were overseen by NAB president Alfred McCosker and the rest of the
code committee (and their professional affiliations):
1)
Leo J. Fitzpatrick, NAB vice-pres./WJR (CBS affiliate, Detroit).
2)
John Shepard, III, NAB vice-pres./pres. Yankee Network (New England).
3)
Arthur B. Church, NAB treasurer/KMBC (CBS affiliate, Kansas City).


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