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Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  7 4) William S. Hedges, KDKA (NBC Blue affiliate, Pittsburgh). 5) H.C. Carpenter, WPTF (NBC affiliate, Raleigh). 6) J. Thomas Lyons, WCAO (CBS affiliate, Baltimore). 7) I.Z. Buckwalter, WGAL (NBC affiliate, Lancaster, Pa.). 8) James C. Hanrahan, KSO (proxy for G. Cowles, Jr.), (NBC Blue-affiliate, Des Moines). 9) Mr. Guider, KHJ (proxy for Leo B. Tyson) (Independent, Los Angeles). 10) Ralph Colin, CBS (proxy for Henry A. Bellows). 11) F.M. Russell, NBC (proxy for George F. McClelland). 12) Louis F. Caldwell WGN (proxy for Quin A. Ryan) (Independent, Chicago). 13) G.A. Richards, Member NRA Code Committee/WJR (CBS affiliate, Detroit). 14) Philip G. Loucks, NAB. The NAB committee agreed that broadcasters should place all "routine" employees on a 40-hour week. However "routine" in this case was used to define managerial or executive positions, and also included announcers and producers with no responsibility for electronic equipment. There was another key loophole. All employees who earned more than $35 week, or who worked in stations which employed ten or fewer persons (and who did not receive more than $25 per week), were excluded from any maximum hour limitations. This narrow range of employees meant that very few, if any, non-managerial broadcasting employees would be covered by the industry-derived 40-hour per week limitation. Not surprisingly, a 48-hour week was specified for radio technicians--the largest group of broadcast workers and the group that surely had the most to gain from implementation of the NRA codes. Prior to 1933, many worked the longest hours of any broadcast employee (60-80 hours per week, or more on occasion). Wages for radio technicians were also set low. Under the initial codes, technicians were paid not less than $20 per week, and $15 per week at stations employing less than ten persons. The proposed NAB codes also created a sub-minimum apprentice wage of $12 per week, for employees with less than six months of experience on the job. 8 The proposed codes also specified an accounting procedure that allowed the NAB, upon a two-thirds vote of its membership, to force any broadcaster suspected of violating the codes to submit a report of its actions. (All false reports would be deemed as code violations.) The NAB reserved its right, as the only national lobbying group for the broadcasting industry, to investigate

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
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7
4)
William S. Hedges, KDKA (NBC Blue affiliate, Pittsburgh).
5)
H.C. Carpenter, WPTF (NBC affiliate, Raleigh).
6)
J. Thomas Lyons, WCAO (CBS affiliate, Baltimore).
7)
I.Z. Buckwalter, WGAL (NBC affiliate, Lancaster, Pa.).
8)
James C. Hanrahan, KSO (proxy for G. Cowles, Jr.),
(NBC Blue-affiliate, Des Moines).
9)
Mr. Guider, KHJ (proxy for Leo B. Tyson) (Independent, Los Angeles).
10)
Ralph Colin, CBS (proxy for Henry A. Bellows).
11)
F.M. Russell, NBC (proxy for George F. McClelland).
12)
Louis F. Caldwell WGN (proxy for Quin A. Ryan) (Independent, Chicago).
13)
G.A. Richards, Member NRA Code Committee/WJR (CBS affiliate, Detroit).
14) Philip
G.
Loucks,
NAB.
The NAB committee agreed that broadcasters should place all "routine" employees on a 40-hour
week. However "routine" in this case was used to define managerial or executive positions, and also
included announcers and producers with no responsibility for electronic equipment. There was
another key loophole. All employees who earned more than $35 week, or who worked in stations
which employed ten or fewer persons (and who did not receive more than $25 per week), were
excluded from any maximum hour limitations. This narrow range of employees meant that very few,
if any, non-managerial broadcasting employees would be covered by the industry-derived 40-hour
per week limitation.
Not surprisingly, a 48-hour week was specified for radio technicians--the largest group of
broadcast workers and the group that surely had the most to gain from implementation of the NRA
codes. Prior to 1933, many worked the longest hours of any broadcast employee (60-80 hours per
week, or more on occasion). Wages for radio technicians were also set low. Under the initial codes,
technicians were paid not less than $20 per week, and $15 per week at stations employing less than
ten persons. The proposed NAB codes also created a sub-minimum apprentice wage of $12 per week,
for employees with less than six months of experience on the job.
8
The proposed codes also specified an accounting procedure that allowed the NAB, upon a
two-thirds vote of its membership, to force any broadcaster suspected of violating the codes to
submit a report of its actions. (All false reports would be deemed as code violations.) The NAB
reserved its right, as the only national lobbying group for the broadcasting industry, to investigate


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