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Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext: Introducing Expanding Hypertext--Are They Adventurous?
Unformatted Document Text:  Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext 7 network structures connect a given node to any other related node (McDonald, 1998). Different hypertext structures offer users different levels of control (McDonald, 1998). For example, hierarchical structures confine learners’ movements and restrict their freedom to browse while network structures place few constraints on users’ movements (McDonald, 1998). However, this freedom seems to create an additional cognitive burden and disorientation (McDonald, 1998). In addition, unstructured systems such as nonlinear or paged hypertext provide little information about topic relations. On the other hand, highly structured systems provide more information about topic relations (Shapiro, 1998) and might reduce possible disorientation while limiting the opportunity for individual freedom (Last, O’Donnell & Kelly, 1998). Hypertext structures have been typically studied in comparison with reading manipulations--methods of connecting the various passages in hypertext. There are two different types of reading manipulation; scrolling versus paging. Scrolling allows users to read the text line-by-line through one display window. Paging displays the text in a new screen, showing the text block for block so as to simulate pages in a physical book. When hypertext structures with different reading manipulations were examined based on performance measurements of 24 search tasks for their ease of using and user satisfaction in search tasks, a purely hierarchical hypertext with scrolling appeared to be more useful because it seemed to provide clear insight into the structure of the hypertext (Van Nimwegen, Pouw, & Oostendorp, 1999). In fact, adding linearity did not help much to increase usability of hypertext such as efficacy, ease of use, and user-satisfaction when the reading- manipulation consisted of scrolling as well as paging (Van Nimwegen, Pouw, & Oostendorp, 1999) for search tasks. In fact, the effects of reading manipulation vary based on readers previous experience with similar systems. Tombaugh, Lickorish and Wright (1987) found that, for

Authors: Lee, Moon.
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Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext
7
network structures connect a given node to any other related node (McDonald, 1998).
Different hypertext structures offer users different levels of control (McDonald,
1998). For example, hierarchical structures confine learners’ movements and restrict their
freedom to browse while network structures place few constraints on users’ movements
(McDonald, 1998). However, this freedom seems to create an additional cognitive burden
and disorientation (McDonald, 1998). In addition, unstructured systems such as nonlinear or
paged
hypertext provide little information about topic relations. On the other hand,
highly structured systems provide more information about topic relations (Shapiro, 1998) and
might reduce possible disorientation while limiting the opportunity for individual freedom
(Last, O’Donnell & Kelly, 1998).
Hypertext structures have been typically studied in comparison with reading
manipulations--methods of connecting the various passages in hypertext. There are two
different types of reading manipulation; scrolling versus paging. Scrolling allows users to
read the text line-by-line through one display window. Paging displays the text in a new
screen, showing the text block for block so as to simulate pages in a physical book. When
hypertext structures with different reading manipulations were examined based on
performance measurements of 24 search tasks for their ease of using and user satisfaction in
search tasks, a purely hierarchical hypertext with scrolling appeared to be more useful
because it seemed to provide clear insight into the structure of the hypertext (Van Nimwegen,
Pouw, & Oostendorp, 1999). In fact, adding linearity did not help much to increase usability
of hypertext such as efficacy, ease of use, and user-satisfaction when the reading-
manipulation consisted of scrolling as well as paging (Van Nimwegen, Pouw, & Oostendorp,
1999) for search tasks.
In fact, the effects of reading manipulation vary based on readers
previous
experience with similar systems. Tombaugh, Lickorish and Wright (1987) found that, for


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