All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext: Introducing Expanding Hypertext--Are They Adventurous?
Unformatted Document Text:  Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext 8 experienced users, paging is more usable than scrolling and that, for inexperienced users, the reverse is true. On the other hand, Piolat, Roussey and Thunin (1997) found that when comprehension was the goal, paging showed more positive results over scrolling. It suggests that individuals’ previous experiences with a system and cognitive capacity, communication goals, and system characteristics should be taken into consideration for designing effective computer-mediated communication materials. Disorientation in Hypertext Many hypothesize that individuals take an active role in finding information and in encountering different types of information in using hypertext (Bourne, 1990; Dee-Lucas & Larkin, 1995). However, there is considerable disagreement as to whether hypertext is beneficial for all individuals (Hammond & Allinson, 1989; Jonessen & Wang, 1990; Spiro & Jehng, 1990; Schroeder, 1994; Dee-Lucas & Larkin, 1995; McDonald, 1998; McDonald & Stevenson, 1996). Many have pointed out that hypertext users often get lost or become disoriented (Batra et al, 1993; Hammond, 1989; Hammond & Allinson, 1989; Smith & Wilson, 1993; Kim & Hirtle, 1995; McDonald & Stevenson, 1996; McDonald & Stevenson, 1999; Unz & Hesse, 1999; Rouet, Levonen, Dillon, & Spiro,1996). It was suggested that hypertext, by causing the scrambling of an author's intended order and sudden changes in context, disorients users (McDonald & Stevenson, 1996; Unz & Hesse, 1999). Furthermore, individuals tend to skip or leave out crucial information, creating fragmented knowledge (Shneiderman, 1992). Disorientation can occur in two ways. First, the reader can become disoriented in terms of hyper-spaces getting lost, such as not knowing where he or she is or not knowing where to go next (McKnight, 1996; Dillon, 1996; Edwards & Hardman, 1989). The other kind of disorientation is cognitive disorientation difficulty making a coherent understanding

Authors: Lee, Moon.
first   previous   Page 8 of 34   next   last



background image
Effective Computer-mediated Communication Using Hypertext
8
experienced users, paging is more usable than scrolling and that, for inexperienced users, the
reverse is true. On the other hand, Piolat, Roussey and Thunin (1997) found that when
comprehension was the goal, paging showed more positive results over scrolling. It suggests
that individuals’ previous experiences with a system and cognitive capacity, communication
goals, and system characteristics should be taken into consideration for designing effective
computer-mediated communication materials.
Disorientation in Hypertext
Many hypothesize that individuals take an active role in finding information and in
encountering different types of information in using hypertext (Bourne, 1990; Dee-Lucas &
Larkin, 1995). However, there is considerable disagreement as to whether hypertext is
beneficial for all individuals (Hammond & Allinson, 1989; Jonessen & Wang, 1990; Spiro &
Jehng, 1990; Schroeder, 1994; Dee-Lucas & Larkin, 1995; McDonald, 1998; McDonald &
Stevenson, 1996).
Many have pointed out that hypertext users often get lost or become disoriented
(Batra et al, 1993; Hammond, 1989; Hammond & Allinson, 1989; Smith & Wilson, 1993;
Kim & Hirtle, 1995; McDonald & Stevenson, 1996; McDonald & Stevenson, 1999; Unz &
Hesse, 1999; Rouet, Levonen, Dillon, & Spiro,1996). It was suggested that hypertext, by
causing the scrambling of an author's intended order and sudden changes in context,
disorients users (McDonald & Stevenson, 1996; Unz & Hesse, 1999). Furthermore,
individuals tend to skip or leave out crucial information, creating fragmented knowledge
(Shneiderman, 1992).
Disorientation can occur in two ways. First, the reader can become disoriented in
terms of hyper-spaces
getting lost, such as not knowing where he or she is or not knowing
where to go next (McKnight, 1996; Dillon, 1996; Edwards & Hardman, 1989). The other
kind of disorientation is cognitive disorientation
difficulty making a coherent understanding


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.