All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Balancing tradition and modernity in narratives surrounding contraception use among poorer women in West Bengal, India.
Unformatted Document Text:  16 their lives in various ways. Many have deeply ambivalent reactions to not having children. Within the interview situation women recognized and talked about this uncertainty as often as they did not, and the ambivalence is occasionally recognizable only in later perusals of the interviews. Broadly classified, these anxieties seem to stem from fears about (1) children dying as infants or adults, (2) not fulfilling duties as wives and mothers (3) Their own and their children’s futures in terms of community and support. These anxieties are magnified when a woman does not have support from a husband or marital family in her decision to use birth control, because she is well aware that if they are proved right in their opposition, this could have material effects on her life. India’s infant mortality rate is not as high as many other developing countries and is falling rapidly. It stands currently at 68 deaths per 1,000 population (International Institute of Population Sciences, 2000). West Bengal’s infant mortality rate is 49 deaths per 1000 live births (International Institution of Population Sciences, 2001). What the statistics do not tell, however, is that almost every baby that dies belongs to a woman who grieves for it, and lives in fear that another child of hers might suffer the same fate. Several women talked about “someone (she) know(s) who knows” a woman who had three children, and thinking she was not going to have any more, she apparently had an ‘operation’ (a tubal ligation). Shortly after the operation, she lost all her three children in a train wreck/ drowning accident/ road accident (there are several versions of this story). It is fairly clear that the story is apocryphal, but the fact that women would repeat it is a clear indication that this is a real possibility in their minds. Women who have at any point

Authors: Mookerjee, Devalina.
first   previous   Page 16 of 27   next   last



background image
16
their lives in various ways. Many have deeply ambivalent reactions to not having
children. Within the interview situation women recognized and talked about this
uncertainty as often as they did not, and the ambivalence is occasionally recognizable
only in later perusals of the interviews.
Broadly classified, these anxieties seem to stem from fears about (1) children dying
as infants or adults, (2) not fulfilling duties as wives and mothers (3) Their own and their
children’s futures in terms of community and support. These anxieties are magnified
when a woman does not have support from a husband or marital family in her decision to
use birth control, because she is well aware that if they are proved right in their
opposition, this could have material effects on her life.
India’s infant mortality rate is not as high as many other developing countries and
is falling rapidly. It stands currently at 68 deaths per 1,000 population (International
Institute of Population Sciences, 2000). West Bengal’s infant mortality rate is 49 deaths
per 1000 live births (International Institution of Population Sciences, 2001). What the
statistics do not tell, however, is that almost every baby that dies belongs to a woman
who grieves for it, and lives in fear that another child of hers might suffer the same fate.
Several women talked about “someone (she) know(s) who knows” a woman who had
three children, and thinking she was not going to have any more, she apparently had an
‘operation’ (a tubal ligation). Shortly after the operation, she lost all her three children in
a train wreck/ drowning accident/ road accident (there are several versions of this story).
It is fairly clear that the story is apocryphal, but the fact that women would repeat it is a
clear indication that this is a real possibility in their minds. Women who have at any point


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.