All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Balancing tradition and modernity in narratives surrounding contraception use among poorer women in West Bengal, India.
Unformatted Document Text:  20 “My children are my life. Even if my husband told me to have a ligation tomorrow I would not do it (…) but he wants more children, so it is my duty as his wife to have children.” As the quote above shows, the concept of duty is very strongly embedded in this worldview. One of the offshoots of this is a situation that is complex and has to be discussed in some detail. Having fewer children means that a woman is no longer needed full time at home and can go out and seek waged employment, assuming she is allowed by her family to do so. Economic compulsions and a strong desire to provide education and a higher standard of living for their children also contribute to women leaving the home for work. However, when they do so, women suffer from strong feelings of guilt about not fulfilling duties as wife and mother at home. These feelings of guilt seem to persist even when the woman is confident that the care her children are receiving while she is out to work is adequate. Most often caregivers at home are other female members of the family, usually a mother-in-law, a sister-in-law, or a mother who lives nearby. Occasionally this guilt is compounded when children accuse their mother of being out of the house when their friends or cousins mothers stay at home, or when something happens to a child while a mother is out at work. One woman at Bangur who works as a maid for a living brought up in an interview the time her son cut his leg very badly and had to be brought to the hospital by her aged mother: “When I came home that night I wanted to stop working and stay home for my children. He was very badly hurt and had been calling for me (…) (But) I knew that if I did that my children would have to stop school. We

Authors: Mookerjee, Devalina.
first   previous   Page 20 of 27   next   last



background image
20
“My children are my life. Even if my husband told me to have a ligation
tomorrow I would not do it (…) but he wants more children, so it is my
duty as his wife to have children.”
As the quote above shows, the concept of duty is very strongly embedded in this
worldview. One of the offshoots of this is a situation that is complex and has to be
discussed in some detail.
Having fewer children means that a woman is no longer needed full time at home
and can go out and seek waged employment, assuming she is allowed by her family to do
so. Economic compulsions and a strong desire to provide education and a higher standard
of living for their children also contribute to women leaving the home for work.
However, when they do so, women suffer from strong feelings of guilt about not
fulfilling duties as wife and mother at home. These feelings of guilt seem to persist even
when the woman is confident that the care her children are receiving while she is out to
work is adequate. Most often caregivers at home are other female members of the family,
usually a mother-in-law, a sister-in-law, or a mother who lives nearby. Occasionally this
guilt is compounded when children accuse their mother of being out of the house when
their friends or cousins mothers stay at home, or when something happens to a child
while a mother is out at work. One woman at Bangur who works as a maid for a living
brought up in an interview the time her son cut his leg very badly and had to be brought
to the hospital by her aged mother:
“When I came home that night I wanted to stop working and stay home
for my children. He was very badly hurt and had been calling for me (…)
(But) I knew that if I did that my children would have to stop school. We


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.