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Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting

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Abstract:

When broadcasting emerged, it was praised as a new communicative tool to uplift democracy, culture, and education of the nation; and also considered as a new business area to mobilize profits. These two—often, conflicting—goals had created a great deal of controversies in policy discussions and choices in organizing American broadcasting. This study examines how technological rationality used the principle of the public interest in making policy decisions and formulating regulatory framework during the early years of institutionalizing broadcasting. For this purpose, three main questions will be discussed. First, how was the language of the public interest relocated in the changing technological discrimination over time? Second, how were the socioeconomic qualitative factors camouflaged with instrumental, technological rationality in broadcasting policy-making regarding the wavelength allocation and licensing? Third, how did the public respond to such dictation of listening interests and technological interpretation of the public interest in organizing broadcasting?

Most Common Document Word Stems:

station (255), radio (255), broadcast (239), public (129), class (115), b (106), hoover (83), power (79), 1925 (78), interest (77), confer (73), listen (65), superpow (57), licens (57), would (56), new (56), interfer (55), servic (53), technolog (50), commerc (50), nation (49),

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Public Interest, and Technological Rationality, and American Broadcasting
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Baek, Misook. "Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111661_index.html>

APA Citation:

Baek, M. , 2003-05-27 "Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111661_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When broadcasting emerged, it was praised as a new communicative tool to uplift democracy, culture, and education of the nation; and also considered as a new business area to mobilize profits. These two—often, conflicting—goals had created a great deal of controversies in policy discussions and choices in organizing American broadcasting. This study examines how technological rationality used the principle of the public interest in making policy decisions and formulating regulatory framework during the early years of institutionalizing broadcasting. For this purpose, three main questions will be discussed. First, how was the language of the public interest relocated in the changing technological discrimination over time? Second, how were the socioeconomic qualitative factors camouflaged with instrumental, technological rationality in broadcasting policy-making regarding the wavelength allocation and licensing? Third, how did the public respond to such dictation of listening interests and technological interpretation of the public interest in organizing broadcasting?

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 35
Word count: 13402
Text sample:
Engineering the Public Interest 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting Herbert Hoover Secretary of Commerce first introduced the principle of the public interest in the First National Radio Conference convened in February 1922 to develop the new phenomenon of broadcasting. Then the public interest emerged as a leading regulatory principle through a series of National Radio Conferences between 1922 and 1925. The Radio Act of 1927 came to incorporate the phrase the “pubic interest convenience and necessity
A Tower in Babel 174. On Educational broadcasting stations as sellers of the given wavelengths Ibid; also Frost Education’s Own Stations 419. Stephens College in Columbia Mo. sold its station KFRU. Church owned stations were also to be offered for selling. It was sometimes a trade for free time clinched a transfer without cash. 73 Hugh G. J. Aitken “Allocating the Spectrum: The Origins of Radio Regulation ” Technology and Culture 35 (Oct. 1994) 699. 74 Ibid. 75 Slotten


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