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Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined

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Abstract:

Nearly fifty African-run newspapers were established between the years 1921 and 1952 in colonial Kenya. The history of the Kenyan press should include an account of these publications provided by the nationalist journalists who produced them. What vision did these Africans hold for the press? This paper finds that far from seeing their publications as only political propaganda, nationalists saw the press playing more complex roles. They believed it could provide a forum for voices which were usually ignored by the settler-oriented mainstream press. They thought it would encourage self-reliance among a people whose self-worth was denied by the colonial institutions and people who governed them. They envisioned it creating a sense of community, and the nationalists did believe the press could raise political consciousness by giving voice to the complaints about and criticisms of the colonial government. Ultimately, they believed that the press should provide a nonviolent means of resistance to the colonial government.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

african (135), press (87), polit (56), newspap (45), kenya (45), paper (44), public (38), coloni (36), govern (36), publish (28), group (26), would (23), africa (22), new (22), ethnic (20), communiti (20), asian (19), editor (19), kenyatta (18), also (18), nation (17),

Author's Keywords:

Kenya, African press
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Wall, Melissa. "Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111667_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wall, M. A. , 2003-05-27 "Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111667_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Nearly fifty African-run newspapers were established between the years 1921 and 1952 in colonial Kenya. The history of the Kenyan press should include an account of these publications provided by the nationalist journalists who produced them. What vision did these Africans hold for the press? This paper finds that far from seeing their publications as only political propaganda, nationalists saw the press playing more complex roles. They believed it could provide a forum for voices which were usually ignored by the settler-oriented mainstream press. They thought it would encourage self-reliance among a people whose self-worth was denied by the colonial institutions and people who governed them. They envisioned it creating a sense of community, and the nationalists did believe the press could raise political consciousness by giving voice to the complaints about and criticisms of the colonial government. Ultimately, they believed that the press should provide a nonviolent means of resistance to the colonial government.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 22
Word count: 6538
Text sample:
Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined Nearly fifty African-run newspapers were established between the years 1921 and 1952 in colonial Kenya. Some thrived reaching readers across the East African colonies. Others died after the first edition or two. Most were run by political leaders in the nationalist movement. Yet very little is known about these papers or the vision of the press of the nationalist editors who produced them. This is partly because
Quarterly 52: 30-36. Seidenberg D. A. 1983. Uhuru and the Kenya Indians; The Role of a Minority Community in Kenya Politics 1939-1963. Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Ltd. Switzer L. 1997. South Africa’s Alternative Press; Voices of Protest and Resistance 1880-1960. London: Cambridge University Press. Switzer L. and Adhikair M. 2000. South Africa’s Resistance Press; Alternative Voices in the Last Generation Under Apartheid. Athens: Ohio University Center for International Studies. Thuku H. 1970. Autobiography. Nairobi: Oxford University Press. Tomaselli K.


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