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Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  11 institutions, church, or city and state agencies “operating from more altruistic motives.” These numbers showed the tendency of decreasing of Class A and C stations and increasing of Class B commercial stations. As more stations became able to meet the requirement for Class B, Class B wavebands were soon exhausted. When operation of superpower stations had been stabilized and the Fourth Conference ended up removing the Class B category. 26 Finally, at the Third Conference, Hoover acknowledged that the growing demand for Class B stations was one of the most significant challenges to radio’s development. He noted that duplicating Class B frequencies could cause more interference among Class B stations and would go against the intent for which they were created. The suggested policy was to extend the waveband to 200 to 545 meters (from 222 to 545 meters) and to abolish Class C on 360 meters, which was denounced as “one of the most important causes for congestion in the broadcasting band.” The extension cleared all other types of service on the wavebands for the exclusive use for broadcasting and allowed a large number of non-interfering channels. The Class C stations would have to discontinue for new Class B channels after November 15, 1924. 27 The zoning system was designed to provide a large portion of wavelengths for the congested areas. The Class B waveband between 280 and 545 (formerly between 288 and 545) meters was subdivided to create 47 (formerly 40) channels for Class B in a separation of from 10 to 50 kilocycles. By duplicating the same channel for some of the Class B stations in the Pacific Coast area, the total number of possible channels became 63 for approximate 60 Class B stations. The new wavelengths between 200 and 278 meters (formerly between 222 and 286) meters created 32 (formerly 30) Class A channels to accommodate about 500 stations. About 89 active Class C stations on 360 meters had to quit or to move to either Class A or B with suitable power and qualification. It was said that the expanded new wavelengths would enable local, mostly Class A, stations to overcome static and other interference problems for small set owners,

Authors: Baek, Misook.
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11
institutions, church, or city and state agencies “operating from more altruistic motives.” These
numbers showed the tendency of decreasing of Class A and C stations and increasing of Class B
commercial stations. As more stations became able to meet the requirement for Class B, Class B
wavebands were soon exhausted. When operation of superpower stations had been stabilized and
the Fourth Conference ended up removing the Class B category.
26
Finally, at the Third Conference, Hoover acknowledged that the growing demand for
Class B stations was one of the most significant challenges to radio’s development. He noted that
duplicating Class B frequencies could cause more interference among Class B stations and
would go against the intent for which they were created. The suggested policy was to extend the
waveband to 200 to 545 meters (from 222 to 545 meters) and to abolish Class C on 360 meters,
which was denounced as “one of the most important causes for congestion in the broadcasting
band.” The extension cleared all other types of service on the wavebands for the exclusive use
for broadcasting and allowed a large number of non-interfering channels. The Class C stations
would have to discontinue for new Class B channels after November 15, 1924.
27
The zoning system was designed to provide a large portion of wavelengths for the
congested areas. The Class B waveband between 280 and 545 (formerly between 288 and 545)
meters was subdivided to create 47 (formerly 40) channels for Class B in a separation of from 10
to 50 kilocycles. By duplicating the same channel for some of the Class B stations in the Pacific
Coast area, the total number of possible channels became 63 for approximate 60 Class B stations.
The new wavelengths between 200 and 278 meters (formerly between 222 and 286) meters
created 32 (formerly 30) Class A channels to accommodate about 500 stations. About 89 active
Class C stations on 360 meters had to quit or to move to either Class A or B with suitable power
and qualification. It was said that the expanded new wavelengths would enable local, mostly
Class A, stations to overcome static and other interference problems for small set owners,


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