All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  2 (Westinghouse), and General Electric Corporation (GE)—gained indisputable privileges that granted the preferred portion of the airwaves as a necessary reward for their investments. The final report of the First Radio Conference released on April 27, 1922 defined radio communication as a public utility, and the public interest was endorsed as a guiding principle in exercising the regulatory authority over radio. 1 By tying radio communication to the regulatory precedents of public industries, the radio industry laid the ground for interpreting their business interests in broadcasting service as public service. The public utility regulation assumed natural monopoly that one company controls limited national resources in the approval and the aid of the federal government to make it reach the largest population. The basic idea held the belief in the efficiency of large consolidation and the destructiveness of competition and utilitarian quantitative goal of serving the greatest number of people by a few large corporations. 2 In the meantime, the First Radio Conference established the hierarchical classification of broadcasting stations based on “character, quality, and value [of broadcasting service] to the public.” This classification had prioritized “governmental” and “public” broadcasting over “private” and “toll” broadcasting. 3 After securing the air bands for their commercial broadcasting, the radio corporations had pushed hard to remove the qualitative properties of the public interests that remained in the classification of program service and to replace them with the quantitative technological standard of transmitting power. Indeed, technology was a crucial factor to ensure the continuity of radio business. To keep the radio craze alive, interference had to be reduced, and broadcasting programs had to be regularly provided. Since the late 1922, Hoover had promoted high power policy to provide clear channel reception first through creation of Class B and later with the permission of superpower, which meant a great deal of privileges mainly to large corporate stations. Hoover combined

Authors: Baek, Misook.
first   previous   Page 2 of 35   next   last



background image
2
(Westinghouse), and General Electric Corporation (GE)—gained indisputable privileges that
granted the preferred portion of the airwaves as a necessary reward for their investments. The
final report of the First Radio Conference released on April 27, 1922 defined radio
communication as a public utility, and the public interest was endorsed as a guiding principle in
exercising the regulatory authority over radio.
1
By tying radio communication to the regulatory precedents of public industries, the
radio industry laid the ground for interpreting their business interests in broadcasting service as
public service. The public utility regulation assumed natural monopoly that one company
controls limited national resources in the approval and the aid of the federal government to make
it reach the largest population. The basic idea held the belief in the efficiency of large
consolidation and the destructiveness of competition and utilitarian quantitative goal of serving
the greatest number of people by a few large corporations.
2
In the meantime, the First Radio Conference established the hierarchical classification
of broadcasting stations based on “character, quality, and value [of broadcasting service] to the
public.” This classification had prioritized “governmental” and “public” broadcasting over
“private” and “toll” broadcasting.
3
After securing the air bands for their commercial broadcasting,
the radio corporations had pushed hard to remove the qualitative properties of the public interests
that remained in the classification of program service and to replace them with the quantitative
technological standard of transmitting power.
Indeed, technology was a crucial factor to ensure the continuity of radio business. To
keep the radio craze alive, interference had to be reduced, and broadcasting programs had to be
regularly provided. Since the late 1922, Hoover had promoted high power policy to provide clear
channel reception first through creation of Class B and later with the permission of superpower,
which meant a great deal of privileges mainly to large corporate stations. Hoover combined


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.