All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  24 cover a wider band. 63 The technical framework alone was not sufficient to justify extra-legal action and to mute protests of applicants charging Hoover with unjust discrimination. Hoover reframed the policy decision between limiting on the licensing number and dividing time as a choice “between public interest and private desire” of those who wanted to run stations. 64 Relying on the language of the public interest, he contrasted freedom for the majority of listeners (the public interest) against freedom of the air for speechmakers (free speech rights of private broadcasters). Licensing could control who could speak among many broadcasters. To avoid criticism about deprivation of broadcasters’ free speech rights, he also constructed free speech in the frame of “public benefit” over “naked commercial selfishness.” He needed to declare the publicness of the broadcasting medium in the opening address of the Fourth Conference: The ether is a public medium, and its use must be for public benefit. The use of a radio channel is justified only if there is public benefit. The dominant element for consideration in the radio field is, and always will be, the great body of the listening public, millions in number, countrywide in distribution. 65 The incumbent broadcasters advocated Hoover’s declaration. It made a precedent that the government could control broadcasters’ free speech rights for listeners’ rights since radio is a public medium. No new stations would be licensed for the sake of listeners’ interests. The public interest principle could restrict broadcasters’ constitutional rights of free speech, and the broadcasters adopted it for the purpose of preserving their vested interests. 66 Paul B. Klugh, Executive Chairman of the NAB, spoke for the broadcasters: When one talks about equality in this broadcast tangle, the listener must come into the argument too. The broadcast channels must be assigned and used in such a manner that the most good and enjoyment comes to the millions of listeners. With this idea in mind,

Authors: Baek, Misook.
first   previous   Page 24 of 35   next   last



background image
24
cover a wider band.
63
The technical framework alone was not sufficient to justify extra-legal action and to
mute protests of applicants charging Hoover with unjust discrimination. Hoover reframed the
policy decision between limiting on the licensing number and dividing time as a choice “between
public interest and private desire” of those who wanted to run stations.
64
Relying on the language
of the public interest, he contrasted freedom for the majority of listeners (the public interest)
against freedom of the air for speechmakers (free speech rights of private broadcasters).
Licensing could control who could speak among many broadcasters. To avoid criticism about
deprivation of broadcasters’ free speech rights, he also constructed free speech in the frame of
“public benefit” over “naked commercial selfishness.” He needed to declare the publicness of the
broadcasting medium in the opening address of the Fourth Conference:
The ether is a public medium, and its use must be for public benefit. The use of a radio
channel is justified only if there is public benefit. The dominant element for
consideration in the radio field is, and always will be, the great body of the listening
public, millions in number, countrywide in distribution.
65
The incumbent broadcasters advocated Hoover’s declaration. It made a precedent that
the government could control broadcasters’ free speech rights for listeners’ rights since radio is a
public medium. No new stations would be licensed for the sake of listeners’ interests. The public
interest principle could restrict broadcasters’ constitutional rights of free speech, and the
broadcasters adopted it for the purpose of preserving their vested interests.
66
Paul B. Klugh,
Executive Chairman of the NAB, spoke for the broadcasters:
When one talks about equality in this broadcast tangle, the listener must come into the
argument too. The broadcast channels must be assigned and used in such a manner that
the most good and enjoyment comes to the millions of listeners. With this idea in mind,


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 24 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.