All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  33 power, The March of Radio,” Radio Broadcast, Jan. 1925, 474. 45 On the vote, “Are You For or Against High Power Broadcasting?” Radio News, Jan. 1925, 1137; Louis Frank, “Super-Power in Radio Broadcasting,” Jan. 1925, 1137;“Results of the Super-power Broadcasting Vote,” Radio News, March 1925, 1673. Gernsback, publisher and editor of Radio News editor, did not oppose Superpower, however, he considered the condition for DXing since Gernsback’s main concern lied in the radio set market, rather than broadcasting business. On DXing, Michele Hilms, Radio Voices: American Broadcasting, 1922-1952 (Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1997), 40-43. DX means any station that is hard to hear or contact or is rarely heard or contacted on a particular frequency. “DX” is the abbreviation for “distant.” http://www.dixing.com . For DX listeners, “Correspondence from Readers, High Power Broadcasting,” Radio News, March 1925, 1683. 46 Hoyt Taylor, director of the Naval Radio research Laboratory, “Radio Anticipation for 1925,” Radio News, March 1925, 1673. 47 On Doellinger, S. R. Winters, “Super-Power, An Interview with J. H. Doellinger,” Radio News, Aug. 1925, 183. He meant that all long distance reception was subject to the interruptions and disturbances from atmospheric discharges and electrical interference, not superpower. On crystal sets, Hugo Gernsback, “Editorial, Advances in Radio,” Oct. 1925, 409. “Medium-sized sets and medium distance,” Aug. 1925, 180. In reading radio magazine articles, it is needed to consider business interests in the sale and manufacture of radio sets, as well as broadcasting stations. Gernsback was also involved in the sale of radio apparatus. On the medium size set, in the discouragement of DXing using an expensive, sensitive set, some radio commentator suggested the medium sized set would satisfy those who wanted to pick up programs from the nearest large city station or medium distant stations with less interference. 48 Stations of 5,000 watts were WOC, Davenport, WLW, and WSAI, of Cincinnati, WCBD, Zion, Illinois and WTAM, Cleveland, 2,500 watts. On the power increase and better service, “This “Super-Power” nonsense,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, September 1925, 636-37. 49 Fading meant that signals come in strong one second and fade out almost entirely the next. For the report of the 50,000 watts stations, “The Month in Radio,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, Nov. 1925, 26. On radio engineers’ position, “Radio Anticipation for 1925,” Radio News, March 1925, 1673. On Hoover statement, Proceedings of the Fourth National Radio Conference and Recommendations for Regulation of Radio, HHPL, Commerce Papers, Radio Conference, National-Fourth, Nov. 9-11, b. 496,1925, 3, 21, 23. 50 J. H. Morecroft, “Superpower is almost there,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, July 1925, 334. WJZ migrated to Bound Brook with 50,000 watts power to resolve static noises which bothered many 500 watts stations away from more than a hundred miles. But the listeners near the superpower stations will have some difficulty in tuning it out to hear distant stations of the nearly same wavelengths; on superpower concerns, “Superpower Broadcasting,” Oct. 1925, 418-19, +558-59. Martin P. Rice, Director of Broadcasting General Electric Company, “Schenectady, The March of Radio,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, May 1925, 45. On 500,000 watts, Harry Sadenwater, the engineer in charge of WGY, was discussing this idea in 1926 despite much interference. An editorial interpretation, “Are 500 kilowatt Broadcasters Coming?” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, Aug. 1926, 298. 51 J. H. Morecroft, “Superpower is almost there,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, July 1925, 334. 52 Foust, Big Voices, 24. 53 Hugh G. J. Aitken, “Allocating the Spectrum: The Origins of Radio Regulation,” Technology and Culture 35 (Oct. 1994), 696. For quotation, “Resolved, That 500-watt Stations Are not Sufficient for Program Service,” Response of Professor Williams to Dreher, Radio Broadcast, Sept. 1925, 765; Carl Dreher, “As the Broadcaster Sees It, A Debate” Radio Broadcast, October 1925. There was exchanges of fierce opposite opinions on superpower between Professor Williams, who ran the local station of WHAZ and Carl Dreher, regular contributor to the section, “As the Broadcaster Sees It,” of Radio Broadcast. 54 On advertising, Dudley Siddal, “Who Owns Our Broadcasting Stations?” Radio Broadcast, Feb. 1925, 710. 56 Released for Use Friday afternoon, December 5, 1924. “Control of radio,” From Hoover to Wallace H. White. Jansky papers, SHSW, f.6 b.7, Dec. 4., 1924; “Secretary Hoover Reviews radio Situation,” Released for use Sunday, Feb. 8, 1925, HHPL, Press Releases, Misc. b. 490. 57 Ibid. 58 Ibid; Slotten, Radio and Television Regulation, 31. 59 “Secretary Hoover Reviews Radio Situation,” Released for Use Sunday, Feb. 8, 1925, HHPL, Commerce Papers, Radio, Correspondence, Press Releases, Misc. b. 490. Hoover published his letter to White in Radio Broadcast in

Authors: Baek, Misook.
first   previous   Page 33 of 35   next   last



background image
33
power, The March of Radio,” Radio Broadcast, Jan. 1925, 474.
45
On the vote, “Are You For or Against High Power Broadcasting?” Radio News, Jan. 1925, 1137; Louis Frank,
“Super-Power in Radio Broadcasting,” Jan. 1925, 1137;“Results of the Super-power Broadcasting Vote,” Radio
News,
March 1925, 1673. Gernsback, publisher and editor of Radio News editor, did not oppose Superpower,
however, he considered the condition for DXing since Gernsback’s main concern lied in the radio set market, rather
than broadcasting business. On DXing, Michele Hilms, Radio Voices: American Broadcasting, 1922-1952
(Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1997), 40-43. DX means any station that is hard to hear or
contact or is rarely heard or contacted on a particular frequency. “DX” is the abbreviation for “distant.”
http://www.dixing.com
. For DX listeners, “Correspondence from Readers, High Power Broadcasting,” Radio News,
March 1925, 1683.
46
Hoyt Taylor, director of the Naval Radio research Laboratory, “Radio Anticipation for 1925,” Radio News, March
1925, 1673.
47
On Doellinger, S. R. Winters, “Super-Power, An Interview with J. H. Doellinger,” Radio News, Aug. 1925, 183.
He meant that all long distance reception was subject to the interruptions and disturbances from atmospheric
discharges and electrical interference, not superpower. On crystal sets, Hugo Gernsback, “Editorial, Advances in
Radio,” Oct. 1925, 409. “Medium-sized sets and medium distance,” Aug. 1925, 180. In reading radio magazine
articles, it is needed to consider business interests in the sale and manufacture of radio sets, as well as broadcasting
stations. Gernsback was also involved in the sale of radio apparatus. On the medium size set, in the discouragement
of DXing using an expensive, sensitive set, some radio commentator suggested the medium sized set would satisfy
those who wanted to pick up programs from the nearest large city station or medium distant stations with less
interference.
48
Stations of 5,000 watts were WOC, Davenport, WLW, and WSAI, of Cincinnati, WCBD, Zion, Illinois and
WTAM, Cleveland, 2,500 watts. On the power increase and better service, “This “Super-Power” nonsense,” The
March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, September 1925, 636-37.
49
Fading meant that signals come in strong one second and fade out almost entirely the next. For the report of the
50,000 watts stations, “The Month in Radio,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, Nov. 1925, 26. On radio
engineers’ position, “Radio Anticipation for 1925,” Radio News, March 1925, 1673. On Hoover statement,
Proceedings of the Fourth National Radio Conference and Recommendations for Regulation of Radio, HHPL,
Commerce Papers, Radio Conference, National-Fourth, Nov. 9-11, b. 496,1925, 3, 21, 23.
50
J. H. Morecroft, “Superpower is almost there,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, July 1925, 334. WJZ
migrated to Bound Brook with 50,000 watts power to resolve static noises which bothered many 500 watts stations
away from more than a hundred miles. But the listeners near the superpower stations will have some difficulty in
tuning it out to hear distant stations of the nearly same wavelengths; on superpower concerns, “Superpower
Broadcasting,” Oct. 1925, 418-19, +558-59. Martin P. Rice, Director of Broadcasting General Electric Company,
“Schenectady, The March of Radio,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, May 1925, 45. On 500,000 watts,
Harry Sadenwater, the engineer in charge of WGY, was discussing this idea in 1926 despite much interference. An
editorial interpretation, “Are 500 kilowatt Broadcasters Coming?” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, Aug. 1926,
298.
51
J. H. Morecroft, “Superpower is almost there,” The March of Radio, Radio Broadcast, July 1925, 334.
52
Foust, Big Voices, 24.
53
Hugh G. J. Aitken, “Allocating the Spectrum: The Origins of Radio Regulation,” Technology and Culture 35 (Oct.
1994), 696. For quotation, “Resolved, That 500-watt Stations Are not Sufficient for Program Service,” Response of
Professor Williams to Dreher, Radio Broadcast, Sept. 1925, 765; Carl Dreher, “As the Broadcaster Sees It, A
Debate” Radio Broadcast, October 1925. There was exchanges of fierce opposite opinions on superpower between
Professor Williams, who ran the local station of WHAZ and Carl Dreher, regular contributor to the section, “As the
Broadcaster Sees It,” of Radio Broadcast.
54
On advertising, Dudley Siddal, “Who Owns Our Broadcasting Stations?” Radio Broadcast, Feb. 1925, 710.
56
Released for Use Friday afternoon, December 5, 1924. “Control of radio,” From Hoover to Wallace H. White.
Jansky papers, SHSW, f.6 b.7, Dec. 4., 1924; “Secretary Hoover Reviews radio Situation,” Released for use Sunday,
Feb. 8, 1925, HHPL, Press Releases, Misc. b. 490.
57
Ibid.
58
Ibid; Slotten, Radio and Television Regulation, 31.
59
“Secretary Hoover Reviews Radio Situation,” Released for Use Sunday, Feb. 8, 1925, HHPL, Commerce Papers,
Radio, Correspondence, Press Releases, Misc. b. 490. Hoover published his letter to White in Radio Broadcast in


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 33 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.