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Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  35 the giving of the best possible radio service to the public.” 72 Cited in “Hoover Battles to Block Special Privileges in Radio,” Interview for Cleveland Plain Dealer, by Harry A. Mount. Bible #490. May 1925. HHPL, b. 490. On property rights of the channel, Radio Control: Hearings Before the Committee on Interstate Commerce, U.S. Senate, 69th Congress, 1st Session, January 8-March 2, 1926. Washington, Government Printing Office, 1926: When the 1925 conference and Hoover agreed no further licenses, a channel could be purchased in the market although it could not be obtained by applying. A Department spokesman testified in a Senate Committee, “we take the position that the license ran to the apparatus, and if there is no good reason to the contrary we will recognize that sale and license the new owner of the apparatus.” Cited in Barnouw, A Tower in Babel, 174. On Educational broadcasting stations as sellers of the given wavelengths, Ibid; also Frost, Education’s Own Stations, 419. Stephens College in Columbia, Mo., sold its station, KFRU. Church owned stations were also to be offered for selling. It was sometimes a trade for free time clinched a transfer without cash. 73 Hugh G. J. Aitken, “Allocating the Spectrum: The Origins of Radio Regulation,” Technology and Culture 35 (Oct. 1994), 699. 74 Ibid. 75 Slotten, Radio and Television Regulation, 31; Susan Smulyan, Selling Radio: The Commercialization of American Broadcasting, 1920-1934 (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1994).

Authors: Baek, Misook.
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35
the giving of the best possible radio service to the public.”
72
Cited in “Hoover Battles to Block Special Privileges in Radio,” Interview for Cleveland Plain Dealer, by Harry A.
Mount. Bible #490. May 1925. HHPL, b. 490. On property rights of the channel, Radio Control: Hearings Before
the Committee on Interstate Commerce, U.S. Senate, 69th Congress, 1st Session, January 8-March 2, 1926.
Washington, Government Printing Office, 1926: When the 1925 conference and Hoover agreed no further licenses, a
channel could be purchased in the market although it could not be obtained by applying. A Department spokesman
testified in a Senate Committee, “we take the position that the license ran to the apparatus, and if there is no good
reason to the contrary we will recognize that sale and license the new owner of the apparatus.” Cited in
Barnouw, A Tower in Babel, 174. On Educational broadcasting stations as sellers of the given wavelengths, Ibid;
also Frost, Education’s Own Stations, 419. Stephens College in Columbia, Mo., sold its station, KFRU. Church
owned stations were also to be offered for selling. It was sometimes a trade for free time clinched a transfer without
cash.
73
Hugh G. J. Aitken, “Allocating the Spectrum: The Origins of Radio Regulation,” Technology and Culture 35 (Oct.
1994), 699.
74
Ibid.
75
Slotten, Radio and Television Regulation, 31; Susan Smulyan, Selling Radio: The Commercialization of American
Broadcasting, 1920-1934 (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1994).


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