All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  6 wavelengths between 288 meters and 545 meters on power between 500 and 1,000 watts, while lower powered stations were on the waves from 222 to 286 meters. 10 The Commerce Department formulated 76 frequencies. Forty of these frequencies were reserved for Class Bs, which were more than enough because only around 30 stations were able to meet the power and programming requirements. The remaining 36 frequencies were for local stations of Class A with a 500-watt power limit. Class C stations were designated at 360 meters. Eventually, the more powerful Class C stations would move into the band of Class A, and weaker station would stay and have to share operating time on 360 meters. 11 The implementation of this new rule lessened interference among a few “privileged” Class Bs, but did little for the rest of the 500 broadcasters. The rule of reserving 40 frequencies for Class B stations was the first step toward the high-power clear channel structure that has remained to this day. 12 Recreating Commercial Stations as “Public Broadcasting” As stated, the large radio corporations were pursuing the organization of broadcasting in the model of public utility regulation while driving the regulatory standard toward technological qualification. Classification of Class B licensing was the forerunner of the ultimate goal of establishing a system of national broadcasting service by a few large stations. Then, the large corporations mobilized well-planned public campaigns to push their idea of national broadcasting service, and Hoover started “working it out together” with them. 13 In its memorandum responding to the Temporary Report of Radio Telephony Conference in April 1922, RCA opposed the discrimination between services of stations. RCA officials argued that government officials should not take into account such considerations as commercial versus educational broadcasting when deciding about licensing stations or allocating

Authors: Baek, Misook.
first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last



background image
6
wavelengths between 288 meters and 545 meters on power between 500 and 1,000 watts, while
lower powered stations were on the waves from 222 to 286 meters.
10
The Commerce Department formulated 76 frequencies. Forty of these frequencies were
reserved for Class Bs, which were more than enough because only around 30 stations were able
to meet the power and programming requirements. The remaining 36 frequencies were for local
stations of Class A with a 500-watt power limit. Class C stations were designated at 360 meters.
Eventually, the more powerful Class C stations would move into the band of Class A, and weaker
station would stay and have to share operating time on 360 meters.
11
The implementation of this new rule lessened interference among a few “privileged”
Class Bs, but did little for the rest of the 500 broadcasters. The rule of reserving 40 frequencies
for Class B stations was the first step toward the high-power clear channel structure that has
remained to this day.
12
Recreating Commercial Stations as “Public Broadcasting”
As stated, the large radio corporations were pursuing the organization of broadcasting in
the model of public utility regulation while driving the regulatory standard toward technological
qualification. Classification of Class B licensing was the forerunner of the ultimate goal of
establishing a system of national broadcasting service by a few large stations. Then, the large
corporations mobilized well-planned public campaigns to push their idea of national
broadcasting service, and Hoover started “working it out together” with them.
13
In its memorandum responding to the Temporary Report of Radio Telephony
Conference in April 1922, RCA opposed the discrimination between services of stations. RCA
officials argued that government officials should not take into account such considerations as
commercial versus educational broadcasting when deciding about licensing stations or allocating


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.