All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Engineering the Public Interest, 1922-1925: Technological Rationality and Institutionalization of American Broadcasting
Unformatted Document Text:  8 broadcasters and congressional representatives. 16 The Commerce Department also made publicity efforts to gain control over radio situation in the face of legislative inactivity. After propagating the new policy of Class B licensing as a solution to interference, the Department made efforts to tune up the opinions of the large radio corporations and other governmental sectors in preparation for the Conference which would be attended by responsibilities of those two sectors. This pattern of pre-negotiation meeting between AT&T and the commerce officials would be repeated before the Third Conference. 17 On the other hand, AT&T and Western Electric executives held a meeting in early March 1923. They agreed with Westinghouse that high-class stations should be located in large cities and that the country should be zoned into seven areas centering around cities such as Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Pittsburgh, and Chicago. AT&T executives approved this plan as “the ideal radio broadcasting set-up” for the upcoming Radio Conference. Then, AT&T worked on publicizing the idea to newspapers right before the Conference began. 18 During the Second Conference, AT&T, RCA, and Westinghouse also arranged a plan to limit the power of smaller stations. AT&T prohibited Western Electric from selling transmitting equipment with above 500 watts to other broadcasters. They did not want individual station owners enabled to do national broadcasting with high-power transmitters. 19 Eventually, the Conference would adopt almost what AT&T and RCA suggested. As a result of their concerted efforts, Hoover in his opening address of the Conference started calling commercial station service public broadcasting. The amount of interference has increased greatly and threatens to destroy the growth of the art. . . . Public broadcasting has practically been limited to two wavelengths. . . The development of the art seems to show that the lower range of wave lengths are probably

Authors: Baek, Misook.
first   previous   Page 8 of 35   next   last



background image
8
broadcasters and congressional representatives.
16
The Commerce Department also made publicity efforts to gain control over radio
situation in the face of legislative inactivity. After propagating the new policy of Class B
licensing as a solution to interference, the Department made efforts to tune up the opinions of the
large radio corporations and other governmental sectors in preparation for the Conference which
would be attended by responsibilities of those two sectors. This pattern of pre-negotiation
meeting between AT&T and the commerce officials would be repeated before the Third
Conference.
17
On the other hand, AT&T and Western Electric executives held a meeting in early
March 1923. They agreed with Westinghouse that high-class stations should be located in large
cities and that the country should be zoned into seven areas centering around cities such as
Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Pittsburgh, and Chicago. AT&T executives
approved this plan as “the ideal radio broadcasting set-up” for the upcoming Radio Conference.
Then, AT&T worked on publicizing the idea to newspapers right before the Conference began.
18
During the Second Conference, AT&T, RCA, and Westinghouse also arranged a plan to
limit the power of smaller stations. AT&T prohibited Western Electric from selling transmitting
equipment with above 500 watts to other broadcasters. They did not want individual station
owners enabled to do national broadcasting with high-power transmitters.
19
Eventually, the
Conference would adopt almost what AT&T and RCA suggested. As a result of their concerted
efforts, Hoover in his opening address of the Conference started calling commercial station
service public broadcasting.
The amount of interference has increased greatly and threatens to destroy the growth of
the art. . . . Public broadcasting has practically been limited to two wavelengths. . . The
development of the art seems to show that the lower range of wave lengths are probably


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.