All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined
Unformatted Document Text:  18 subversive of the colonial order . . . there is substantial evidence to show that many African newspapers, even at their worst in the eyes of colonial officials, were asking for reasonable reforms and supporting gradual change." 54 They were often merely bringing the grievances of readers to the attention of the officials. For instance, sedition charges were considered for running a reader’s letter about a European’s dog attacking and seriously injuring a small African child. 55 Some of the papers that were started in the early 1950s were much more inflammatory than earlier ones. Their editors were less educated than those who had come before them. They were often totally untrained in publishing, and their publications often printed distortions and rumors that proved to be untrue. 56 These papers more blatantly challenged colonial rule, from printing harsh criticisms to advertising the location of "tea parties," the euphemism for political sessions where Africans could take an oath against the government. In 1952, the colonial government banned all the African newspapers. The editors, however, sometimes continued to put out their papers as mimeographed sheets that did not need a printing press to be produced. The machines could easily be moved when government threatened to shut them down. In other cases, the papers would simply shut down and then be restarted in a short while under a different name. If the editor was in jail, his assistant or some other associate would take over the duties necessary to keep the paper going. Conclusion The African-run press in colonial Kenya rarely rates more than a quick mention in the history of the pre-independence press in Africa. Just as newspaper histories in this country have tended to leave out those publications that were neither long-lived nor 54 Ibid. 55 Kaggia 83. 56 Gadsden 519.

Authors: Wall, Melissa.
first   previous   Page 18 of 22   next   last



background image
18
subversive of the colonial order . . . there is substantial evidence to show that many
African newspapers, even at their worst in the eyes of colonial officials, were asking for
reasonable reforms and supporting gradual change."
54
They were often merely bringing
the grievances of readers to the attention of the officials. For instance, sedition charges
were considered for running a reader’s letter about a European’s dog attacking and
seriously injuring a small African child.
55
Some of the papers that were started in the early 1950s were much more
inflammatory than earlier ones. Their editors were less educated than those who had
come before them. They were often totally untrained in publishing, and their
publications often printed distortions and rumors that proved to be untrue.
56
These papers
more blatantly challenged colonial rule, from printing harsh criticisms to advertising the
location of "tea parties," the euphemism for political sessions where Africans could take
an oath against the government. In 1952, the colonial government banned all the African
newspapers. The editors, however, sometimes continued to put out their papers as
mimeographed sheets that did not need a printing press to be produced. The machines
could easily be moved when government threatened to shut them down. In other cases,
the papers would simply shut down and then be restarted in a short while under a
different name. If the editor was in jail, his assistant or some other associate would take
over the duties necessary to keep the paper going.
Conclusion
The African-run press in colonial Kenya rarely rates more than a quick mention in
the history of the pre-independence press in Africa. Just as newspaper histories in this
country have tended to leave out those publications that were neither long-lived nor
54
Ibid.
55
Kaggia 83.
56
Gadsden 519.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.