All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined
Unformatted Document Text:  4 aims. Over the years, some of the publishers and editors of these publications provided financial backing and technical support to the Africans. 9 Without such support, many African publications would never have existed. After World War II, an African press exploded onto the scene in Kenya. 10 Forty newspapers were begun between the end of the war and the beginning of the State of Emergency declared by the government in 1952. Publications were usually run by political activists and produced in Nairobi. These publications faced the same problems that Kenya’s newspapers also face today: lack of money to produce them, lack of training for reporters and editors and a poor transportation system which hampered distribution. During this time period, newspaper editors sought to give voice to the political demands of Kenya’s Africans, criticizing racial discrimination as well as calling for African representation in the governmental bodies and for unity among the nation’s various ethnic groups. Though some newspapers were published in English and Swahili, most were produced in African languages such as Kikuyu, Luo, Luhya or Kamba. Their influence spread not only horizontally among the educated Africans, but vertically as well through the common African practice of disseminating news garnered from the mass media via word of mouth. 11 At the end of the 1940s, Kenyans began to realize that the European settlers had little intention of handing back the nation to the Africans. The press became much louder and its editors more willing to risk imprisonment for publishing political demands. By 1952, the colonial government responded by writing new sedition laws and banning the African newspapers. The Africans’ next step in their challenge to the colonial government would be an armed one: Mau Mau. The war of words was over. 9 Gregory. 10 Historical Survey, 191. 11 Kariku. Gadsden.

Authors: Wall, Melissa.
first   previous   Page 4 of 22   next   last



background image
4
aims. Over the years, some of the publishers and editors of these publications provided
financial backing and technical support to the Africans.
9
Without such support, many
African publications would never have existed.
After World War II, an African press exploded onto the scene in Kenya.
10
Forty
newspapers were begun between the end of the war and the beginning of the State of
Emergency declared by the government in 1952. Publications were usually run by
political activists and produced in Nairobi. These publications faced the same problems
that Kenya’s newspapers also face today: lack of money to produce them, lack of training
for reporters and editors and a poor transportation system which hampered distribution.
During this time period, newspaper editors sought to give voice to the political demands
of Kenya’s Africans, criticizing racial discrimination as well as calling for African
representation in the governmental bodies and for unity among the nation’s various ethnic
groups. Though some newspapers were published in English and Swahili, most were
produced in African languages such as Kikuyu, Luo, Luhya or Kamba. Their influence
spread not only horizontally among the educated Africans, but vertically as well through
the common African practice of disseminating news garnered from the mass media via
word of mouth.
11
At the end of the 1940s, Kenyans began to realize that the European
settlers had little intention of handing back the nation to the Africans. The press became
much louder and its editors more willing to risk imprisonment for publishing political
demands. By 1952, the colonial government responded by writing new sedition laws and
banning the African newspapers. The Africans’ next step in their challenge to the
colonial government would be an armed one: Mau Mau. The war of words was over.
9
Gregory.
10
Historical Survey, 191.
11
Kariku. Gadsden.


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.