All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visions of the African Press in Colonial Kenya: What the Nationalists Imagined
Unformatted Document Text:  5 Theoretical and methodological framwork This paper begins by defining the role of Kenya’s African press as being that of alternative media. Although there is not a lot of research on “alternative” journalism in Africa in general, there is a growing body of work on the alternative press in South Africa. This study draws from that research in determining initial categories for understanding the alternative African press. The alternative media in South Africa saw itself as aiming to change society, connect with political movements, collaborate with the community, and serve as a key tool for organizing the community (Switzer, 1997; Switzer, & Adhikair, 2000; Tomaselli & Louw, 1991). They were nonprofit, and aimed at self sufficiency. The information they contained was not found in the maistream media which tended to stereotype or simply ignore the black population (Louw & Tomaselli, 1991; Johnson, 1991). Although South Africa has historically had a much more developed press than Kenya, its history as British colony means it does share some common background with Kenya, and its well-documented history of the alternative press seems a logical basis for developing a study of Kenya’s press. Thus, this project asks what was the vision of the Kenyan resistance leaders of how the press should or could operate? This is not to say that their interpretations of the media are reality, but rather that they might embody certain important ideals that could be the basis for a vision for today. In order to answer this question, the autobiographies and biographies of leading African nationalists were studied. 12 Even though such works can be shaped by conscious or unconscious distortions, they do allow a researcher to discover what African 12 Some of those whose autobiographies are examined actually worked on publications themselves. See Jomo Kenyatta, Suffering Without Bitterness: The Founding of the Kenyan Nation (Nairobi: East African Publishing House, 1968); Oginga Odinga, Not Yet Uhuru: the Autobiography of Oginga Odinga, (New York: Hill and Wang, 1967); Bildad Kaggia, Roots of Freedom, 1921-1963; the Autobiography of Bildad Kaggia, (Nairobi: East African Publishing House, 1975); and Tom Mboya, Freedom and After, (Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1963).

Authors: Wall, Melissa.
first   previous   Page 5 of 22   next   last



background image
5
Theoretical and methodological framwork
This paper begins by defining the role of Kenya’s African press as being that of
alternative media. Although there is not a lot of research on “alternative” journalism in
Africa in general, there is a growing body of work on the alternative press in South
Africa. This study draws from that research in determining initial categories for
understanding the alternative African press. The alternative media in South Africa saw
itself as aiming to change society, connect with political movements, collaborate with the
community, and serve as a key tool for organizing the community (Switzer, 1997;
Switzer, & Adhikair, 2000; Tomaselli & Louw, 1991). They were nonprofit, and aimed
at self sufficiency. The information they contained was not found in the maistream
media which tended to stereotype or simply ignore the black population (Louw &
Tomaselli, 1991; Johnson, 1991).
Although South Africa has historically had a much more developed press than
Kenya, its history as British colony means it does share some common background with
Kenya, and its well-documented history of the alternative press seems a logical basis for
developing a study of Kenya’s press. Thus, this project asks what was the vision of the
Kenyan resistance leaders of how the press should or could operate? This is not to say
that their interpretations of the media are reality, but rather that they might embody
certain important ideals that could be the basis for a vision for today.
In order to answer this question, the autobiographies and biographies of leading
African nationalists were studied.
12
Even though such works can be shaped by conscious
or unconscious distortions, they do allow a researcher to discover what African
12
Some of those whose autobiographies are examined actually worked on publications
themselves. See Jomo Kenyatta, Suffering Without Bitterness: The Founding of the
Kenyan Nation
(Nairobi: East African Publishing House, 1968); Oginga Odinga, Not Yet
Uhuru: the Autobiography of Oginga Odinga
, (New York: Hill and Wang, 1967); Bildad
Kaggia, Roots of Freedom, 1921-1963; the Autobiography of Bildad Kaggia, (Nairobi:
East African Publishing House, 1975); and Tom Mboya, Freedom and After, (Boston:
Little, Brown & Co., 1963).


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.