All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Equal Trust: An Experiment Exploring the Impact of Interactivity and Sources on Individuals' Perceptions of Credibility for Online News Stories
Unformatted Document Text:  21 of exposure to interactive content — which seems more plausible based on the data — is that the availability of multimedia content was not as important as using it. As a whole, the findings suggest that merely making changes in the type of content that is available to online news users is not enough to influence people's assessments of those stories. Viewers are not merely passive recipients of information. To truly impact their opinions, users must become actively engaged with the content. Thus, researchers concerned with the tendency of some online news producers to just drag and drop content onto their Web sites seem warranted (e.g., Singer, 2002). Instead, what may be needed is content that explicitly entices viewers to use it. Future research should determine what are the characteristics and attributes of those individuals who become actively engaged with interactive content. Despite these caveats, content did seem to matter to some degree when individuals used multimedia features. That is, in both the case of perceived source and message credibility, a main effect was at least suggested for participation, and the direction of the main effect showed that using multimedia content was positively related to higher credibility. However, the interactions also demonstrated that the relationships could get quite complicated. For instance, the marginal interaction between source identification and interactivity on perceived source credibility showed that modality heightened credibility when no byline was included, but lowered it when one was included. Moreover, the interaction effect between source identification and participation illustrated that having a bylined story led to greater perceptions of source credibility when people used the interactive content. In contrast, the marginal interaction effect between participation and

Authors: Kiousis, Spiro.
first   previous   Page 23 of 39   next   last



background image
21
of exposure to interactive content — which seems more plausible based on the data — is
that the availability of multimedia content was not as important as using it.
As a whole, the findings suggest that merely making changes in the type of
content that is available to online news users is not enough to influence people's
assessments of those stories. Viewers are not merely passive recipients of information.
To truly impact their opinions, users must become actively engaged with the content.
Thus, researchers concerned with the tendency of some online news producers to just
drag and drop content onto their Web sites seem warranted (e.g., Singer, 2002). Instead,
what may be needed is content that explicitly entices viewers to use it. Future research
should determine what are the characteristics and attributes of those individuals who
become actively engaged with interactive content.
Despite these caveats, content did seem to matter to some degree when
individuals used multimedia features. That is, in both the case of perceived source and
message credibility, a main effect was at least suggested for participation, and the
direction of the main effect showed that using multimedia content was positively related
to higher credibility. However, the interactions also demonstrated that the relationships
could get quite complicated.
For instance, the marginal interaction between source identification and
interactivity on perceived source credibility showed that modality heightened credibility
when no byline was included, but lowered it when one was included. Moreover, the
interaction effect between source identification and participation illustrated that having a
bylined story led to greater perceptions of source credibility when people used the
interactive content. In contrast, the marginal interaction effect between participation and


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.