All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Equal Trust: An Experiment Exploring the Impact of Interactivity and Sources on Individuals' Perceptions of Credibility for Online News Stories
Unformatted Document Text:  2 beginning to look at how variations in the sources of online news stories shape individuals’ judgments of Internet news (e.g., Sundar & Nass, 2001; Sundar 1996, 1998), though credibility has only been a minor component of such research to date. When compared to research on sources, the impact of interactivity on perceptions of credibility has been probed extensively in various investigations of general computer-mediated- communication (e.g., Burgoon, Bengtsson, Cederberg, Lundeberg, & Allspach, 2000), yet little research has analyzed it within an online news setting. As online news and information become more widespread, understanding how interactivity and sources affect perceptions of credibility is crucial from both conceptual and practical standpoints. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Web site interactivity and source identification (to be explained below) on people’s judgments of online news credibility. Specifically, what follows is an overview of relevant literature, a description of an experiment exploring these variables, and the implications of that experiment on future theory and research. Conceptual Framework Interactivity A plethora of controversy has surfaced regarding conceptual and operational definitions of interactivity (Heeter, 1989; Kenney et al., 2000; Williams, Rice, & Rogers, 1988). For example, some scholars define interactivity simply as the degree to which users can supply feedback in communication exchanges (e.g., Wiener, 1948). Moreover, when it comes to analyses of Web site interactivity, the concept usually has been defined in terms of the number of "links" (hyperlinks and email links) that are available to users. Using such a conceptualization, Sundar, Hesser, Kalyanaraman, and Brown (1998) scrutinized

Authors: Kiousis, Spiro.
first   previous   Page 4 of 39   next   last



background image
2
beginning to look at how variations in the sources of online news stories shape
individuals’ judgments of Internet news (e.g., Sundar & Nass, 2001; Sundar 1996, 1998),
though credibility has only been a minor component of such research to date. When
compared to research on sources, the impact of interactivity on perceptions of credibility
has been probed extensively in various investigations of general computer-mediated-
communication (e.g., Burgoon, Bengtsson, Cederberg, Lundeberg, & Allspach, 2000),
yet little research has analyzed it within an online news setting.
As online news and information become more widespread, understanding how
interactivity and sources affect perceptions of credibility is crucial from both conceptual
and practical standpoints. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate the
influence of Web site interactivity and source identification (to be explained below) on
people’s judgments of online news credibility. Specifically, what follows is an overview
of relevant literature, a description of an experiment exploring these variables, and the
implications of that experiment on future theory and research.
Conceptual Framework
Interactivity
A plethora of controversy has surfaced regarding conceptual and operational definitions
of interactivity (Heeter, 1989; Kenney et al., 2000; Williams, Rice, & Rogers, 1988). For
example, some scholars define interactivity simply as the degree to which users can
supply feedback in communication exchanges (e.g., Wiener, 1948). Moreover, when it
comes to analyses of Web site interactivity, the concept usually has been defined in terms
of the number of "links" (hyperlinks and email links) that are available to users. Using
such a conceptualization, Sundar, Hesser, Kalyanaraman, and Brown (1998) scrutinized


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.