All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 13 supported by research. According to Allen, Hauser, Bell & O’Connor, (1994), the presence of adolescent autonomy-seeking behavior tends to be highly correlated with evidence of an underlying positive relationship with parents. Parental Factors Parental anxiety about separation is only one factor in the parental contribution to family conflict during adolescence. Control and monitoring are additional ways in which parents’ behaviors (and their accompanying feelings) contribute to the family interactional design. A study by Pettit et al. (2001) specifically looks at antecedents and outcomes of parental monitoring and psychological control as they relate to issues of early adolescence. The results show a relationship between parental style and level of psychological control with problem behaviors displayed by the adolescent. The results suggest that the parents’ behavior elicit the problem behaviors, rather than the traditional assumption that problem behaviors of the child evoke conflicting responses from the parent. Smetana’s (1995) work identifies four parental styles: authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and undifferentiated. Her work indicates that a parent’s judgment of legitimacy of authority differs with parental style, and, in turn, can affect aspects of the parent-child relationship, such as boundaries, rules, conflict, and discussion. Such evidence emphasizes the need to look beyond the adolescent’s characteristics and behaviors in explaining the storm and stress of adolescence. Parents do not face the challenges of coping with adolescence in a vacuum. During the transitional period of adolescence, not only parental roles, but marital relations also undergo certain changes (Seiffge-Krenke, 1999). Discrepancies in members’ perceptions of family cohesion, expressiveness, and support, especially during early adolescence (Seiffge-Krenke, 1999) are representative of the overall lack of agreement and understanding in some families

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
first   previous   Page 13 of 30   next   last



background image
Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 13
supported by research. According to Allen, Hauser, Bell & O’Connor, (1994), the presence of
adolescent autonomy-seeking behavior tends to be highly correlated with evidence of an
underlying positive relationship with parents.
Parental Factors
Parental anxiety about separation is only one factor in the parental contribution to family
conflict during adolescence. Control and monitoring are additional ways in which parents’
behaviors (and their accompanying feelings) contribute to the family interactional design. A
study by Pettit et al. (2001) specifically looks at antecedents and outcomes of parental
monitoring and psychological control as they relate to issues of early adolescence. The results
show a relationship between parental style and level of psychological control with problem
behaviors displayed by the adolescent. The results suggest that the parents’ behavior elicit the
problem behaviors, rather than the traditional assumption that problem behaviors of the child
evoke conflicting responses from the parent. Smetana’s (1995) work identifies four parental
styles: authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and undifferentiated. Her work indicates that a
parent’s judgment of legitimacy of authority differs with parental style, and, in turn, can affect
aspects of the parent-child relationship, such as boundaries, rules, conflict, and discussion. Such
evidence emphasizes the need to look beyond the adolescent’s characteristics and behaviors in
explaining the storm and stress of adolescence.
Parents do not face the challenges of coping with adolescence in a vacuum. During the
transitional period of adolescence, not only parental roles, but marital relations also undergo
certain changes (Seiffge-Krenke, 1999). Discrepancies in members’ perceptions of family
cohesion, expressiveness, and support, especially during early adolescence (Seiffge-Krenke,
1999) are representative of the overall lack of agreement and understanding in some families


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.