All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 14 during this stage. Studies in marital discord and adolescence support the need to understand the complex factors involved in the family during adolescence (Davies & Windle, 2001). For example, higher conflicts have been shown to be associated with parent’s well being more than adolescent’s well being (Dekovíc, 1999). The adolescent’s attitudes are only a part of the overall equation; the parents’ perception and feelings at this time are equally relevant to defining the family dynamic. Attachment Style Although attachment processes appear to follow certain normative development pathways for all adolescents, for families of adolescents with secure attachment strategies, these paths appear fairly straight, smooth, and easily traversed; contrarily, for families with insecure adolescents, the path may be filled with twists, detours, dead ends, and difficulties (Cassidy & Shaver, 1999). According to Harvey and Byrd (2000), “Research has shown that family functioning predicts many aspects of both normal and maladaptive developmental patterns (e.g., Campbell, Adams, & Dobson, 1984; Noller, Seth-Smith, Bouma, & Schweitzer, 1992), few studies have directly examined the effects of familial attachment on adult development” (p. 345). Studies by Hazan and Shaver (1987) and Feeney and Noller (1990) indicated that the attachment styles of young adults predicted their romantic relationships. These studies found that young adults who had a secure attachment style reported positive perceptions of their family relationship and wished to attain similar adult relationships. In contrast, young adults with an avoidant attachment style reported a sense of mistrust in their adult relationships. Anxious/ ambivalent young adults expressed a desire for deep and secure commitment in their adult relationships. Thus, consistent with the position of both Bowlby (1969) and Ainsworth et al. (1978), the patterns of attachment in family systems can be seen as providing a long-lasting

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
first   previous   Page 14 of 30   next   last



background image
Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 14
during this stage. Studies in marital discord and adolescence support the need to understand the
complex factors involved in the family during adolescence (Davies & Windle, 2001). For
example, higher conflicts have been shown to be associated with parent’s well being more than
adolescent’s well being (Dekovíc, 1999). The adolescent’s attitudes are only a part of the overall
equation; the parents’ perception and feelings at this time are equally relevant to defining the
family dynamic.
Attachment Style
Although attachment processes appear to follow certain normative development
pathways for all adolescents, for families of adolescents with secure attachment strategies, these
paths appear fairly straight, smooth, and easily traversed; contrarily, for families with insecure
adolescents, the path may be filled with twists, detours, dead ends, and difficulties (Cassidy &
Shaver, 1999). According to Harvey and Byrd (2000), “Research has shown that family
functioning predicts many aspects of both normal and maladaptive developmental patterns (e.g.,
Campbell, Adams, & Dobson, 1984; Noller, Seth-Smith, Bouma, & Schweitzer, 1992), few
studies have directly examined the effects of familial attachment on adult development” (p. 345).
Studies by Hazan and Shaver (1987) and Feeney and Noller (1990) indicated that the attachment
styles of young adults predicted their romantic relationships. These studies found that young
adults who had a secure attachment style reported positive perceptions of their family
relationship and wished to attain similar adult relationships. In contrast, young adults with an
avoidant attachment style reported a sense of mistrust in their adult relationships. Anxious/
ambivalent young adults expressed a desire for deep and secure commitment in their adult
relationships. Thus, consistent with the position of both Bowlby (1969) and Ainsworth et al.
(1978), the patterns of attachment in family systems can be seen as providing a long-lasting


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.