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Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 16 that stereotypes of hormonally raging teenagers must be replaced with views consistent with empirical findings. This said, it must also be stated that it is difficult to separate puberty from developmental changes, since they are highly correlated at a social level. Parental Expectations In the large volume of literature on attachment, adolescence, and family, only a small amount has been conducted on the relationship between parental expectations and adolescence. Stereotypes of moody, rebellious teenagers and negative family relations may affect parental expectations of adolescence and subsequently, parents’ behavior toward the child (Freedman- Doan, Arbreton, Harold, & Eccles, 1993). There are numerous variables that can affect parental expectations, for instance, gender, current relationship, perception of influence, and pubertal status of child. The complex interrelationship of these, plus many other factors, makes research in this area quite complicated. Nevertheless, it is understanding this relationship in an interactional way that will provide some answers to improving parent-adolescent relations. Freedman-Doan et al.’s work presents good evidence that parents’ expectations of adolescence may be a major factor in understanding family conflict and, therefore, needs further investigation. Their study considers the complex interactions of gender, pubertal status, worry, influence, and current relationship to expectations of separation, trouble, maturity, emotionality of adolescent, and future influence. Findings support the belief that there is a complex interplay among factors. For example, pubertal status is related to worry, but perceived influence seems able to attenuate its effect and allows for parental optimism about future influence, in spite of worry. Several other multi-factor interactions are seen in their results, showing the importance of viewing the whole parent-child relationship when trying to understand family conflict. Current influence seems especially important to understanding parental expectations.

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
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Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 16
that stereotypes of hormonally raging teenagers must be replaced with views consistent with
empirical findings. This said, it must also be stated that it is difficult to separate puberty from
developmental changes, since they are highly correlated at a social level.
Parental Expectations
In the large volume of literature on attachment, adolescence, and family, only a small
amount has been conducted on the relationship between parental expectations and adolescence.
Stereotypes of moody, rebellious teenagers and negative family relations may affect parental
expectations of adolescence and subsequently, parents’ behavior toward the child (Freedman-
Doan, Arbreton, Harold, & Eccles, 1993). There are numerous variables that can affect parental
expectations, for instance, gender, current relationship, perception of influence, and pubertal
status of child. The complex interrelationship of these, plus many other factors, makes research
in this area quite complicated. Nevertheless, it is understanding this relationship in an
interactional way that will provide some answers to improving parent-adolescent relations.
Freedman-Doan et al.’s work presents good evidence that parents’ expectations of adolescence
may be a major factor in understanding family conflict and, therefore, needs further
investigation. Their study considers the complex interactions of gender, pubertal status, worry,
influence, and current relationship to expectations of separation, trouble, maturity, emotionality
of adolescent, and future influence. Findings support the belief that there is a complex interplay
among factors. For example, pubertal status is related to worry, but perceived influence seems
able to attenuate its effect and allows for parental optimism about future influence, in spite of
worry. Several other multi-factor interactions are seen in their results, showing the importance of
viewing the whole parent-child relationship when trying to understand family conflict. Current
influence seems especially important to understanding parental expectations.


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