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Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 18 RQ2: Is there a relationship between adolescent perceptions of parental attachment and bonding and level of family conflict? RQ3: Do parental expectations and attitudes about adolescence affect the level of family conflict? Method Sample Subjects were obtained through a “snowball” e-mail appeal and personal contacts. Dyads of parents and adolescents were asked to participate for children born between 1982 and 1992 (approximately ages 10-20). This provided a full range of ages since previous research has not consistently defined what years constitute adolescence. Though dyads were requested to participate, some survey results were only completed by either a parent or an adolescent. A total of 112 subjects participated – 59 adolescents and 53 parents, providing 40 dyads. Categories for parents included mother, father, stepmother, stepfather, custodial or non-custodial parents, and parents who were married, divorced, or single. Other demographic information requested included, age, number of children at home, total number of children, age of parent and adolescent, ethnicity, and household income. Instruments Participants completed a self-report survey that was posted on the Internet. Different surveys were used for parents and adolescents. Both parents and adolescents used the Index of Family Relations (IFR; Hudson et al., 1980) to evaluate level of family conflict. The remainder of the parent survey consisted of 101 questions to measure parent attachment style (Self-Report Attachment Scale; Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991), parental separation anxiety (PASAS; Hock et al., 2001), and expectations for adolescence (instrument developed by Freedman-Doan et. al.,

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
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Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 18
RQ2: Is there a relationship between adolescent perceptions of parental attachment and
bonding and level of family conflict?
RQ3: Do parental expectations and attitudes about adolescence affect the level of family
conflict?
Method
Sample
Subjects were obtained through a “snowball” e-mail appeal and personal contacts. Dyads of
parents and adolescents were asked to participate for children born between 1982 and 1992
(approximately ages 10-20). This provided a full range of ages since previous research has not
consistently defined what years constitute adolescence. Though dyads were requested to
participate, some survey results were only completed by either a parent or an adolescent. A total
of 112 subjects participated – 59 adolescents and 53 parents, providing 40 dyads. Categories for
parents included mother, father, stepmother, stepfather, custodial or non-custodial parents, and
parents who were married, divorced, or single. Other demographic information requested
included, age, number of children at home, total number of children, age of parent and
adolescent, ethnicity, and household income.
Instruments
Participants completed a self-report survey that was posted on the Internet. Different
surveys were used for parents and adolescents. Both parents and adolescents used the Index of
Family Relations (IFR; Hudson et al., 1980) to evaluate level of family conflict. The remainder
of the parent survey consisted of 101 questions to measure parent attachment style (Self-Report
Attachment Scale; Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991), parental separation anxiety (PASAS; Hock
et al., 2001), and expectations for adolescence (instrument developed by Freedman-Doan et. al.,


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