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Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 22 Finally, the results for perception of paternal caring and overprotection as related to family conflict were similar but somewhat stronger than seen above for perception of maternal caring and overprotection. The results of the analyses show that perception of paternal care ( β = .54, t (48) = 3.92, p < .01) is a significant predictor of current family conflict; perception of paternal overprotection did not significantly contribute to the model ( β = -.16, t (48) = -1.18, p = .25). Colinearity between variables was slightly high but regression is robust enough to withstand these results. In all analyses, unless otherwise stated, assumptions of linearity between predictors and criterion variables and of a fairly normal distribution were both satisfied. In addition, the scatter plots for all regression did not seem to indicate any significant patterns in the regression residual. Discussion As shown in the results, the hypothesis that attachment and family conflict are related was not supported. One possible factor to consider before dismissing the idea of an association is that the use of the 4-item self-report attachment scale by parents and the small N may be responsible for this lack of support for the hypothesis. Additionally, parents were asked to answer all four style questions on a 1 to 5 Likert scale, thus producing some answers not indicative of any particular attachment style, with 23 out of 53 parents not clearly designated. Using the scale differently, such as ranking from 1 to 4 which statement best describes the parent, might be a more useful way to determine parental attachment in this self-report format. The results for both RQ 1 and RQ 3 did not prove to be significant, suggesting that there is no association between parental separation anxiety or parental expectations and levels of family conflict. However, subsequent analyses of components of each of these factors did indicate relationships between worry and conflict and between anxiety and expectation. Further

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
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Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 22
Finally, the results for perception of paternal caring and overprotection as related to
family conflict were similar but somewhat stronger than seen above for perception of maternal
caring and overprotection. The results of the analyses show that perception of paternal care (
β
=
.54, t
(48)
= 3.92, p < .01) is a significant predictor of current family conflict; perception of
paternal overprotection did not significantly contribute to the model (
β
= -.16, t
(48)
= -1.18, p =
.25). Colinearity between variables was slightly high but regression is robust enough to
withstand these results.
In all analyses, unless otherwise stated, assumptions of linearity between predictors and
criterion variables and of a fairly normal distribution were both satisfied. In addition, the scatter
plots for all regression did not seem to indicate any significant patterns in the regression residual.
Discussion
As shown in the results, the hypothesis that attachment and family conflict are related
was not supported. One possible factor to consider before dismissing the idea of an association is
that the use of the 4-item self-report attachment scale by parents and the small N may be
responsible for this lack of support for the hypothesis. Additionally, parents were asked to
answer all four style questions on a 1 to 5 Likert scale, thus producing some answers not
indicative of any particular attachment style, with 23 out of 53 parents not clearly designated.
Using the scale differently, such as ranking from 1 to 4 which statement best describes the
parent, might be a more useful way to determine parental attachment in this self-report format.
The results for both RQ 1 and RQ 3 did not prove to be significant, suggesting that there
is no association between parental separation anxiety or parental expectations and levels of
family conflict. However, subsequent analyses of components of each of these factors did
indicate relationships between worry and conflict and between anxiety and expectation. Further


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