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Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 23 investigation of these complex factors with changes in measurement and more precise scoring may reveal relationships that were obscured in this study by several factors, including small number of items in scales, self-reports, and a very small N. RQ 2 inquired as to the level of relationship between adolescent perceptions of parental attachment and family conflict. Two different methods of measurement (one for parents as a unit and one for mother and father separately) indicated adolescent perception of parental attachment as a strong predictor for family conflict. With improved measurement and a larger sample for future studies, this result may be important to seeing discrepancies between parental attachment style and adolescent perception of attachment style. Research has focused on attachment of children, and to a lesser degree of the parental style. If perception of attachment is a stronger indicator of conflict, than actual style, then further research is warranted. Perceptions of paternal caring and overprotection were slightly stronger indicators of family conflict than perceptions of maternal caring and overprotection. This reflects the importance of separating adolescent research into the examination of the mother-child and father-child relationship individually. Frequently, adolescents do not interact with their parents as a familial unit but in a dyad with either mother or father. Differences in perspectives of autonomy, attachment style, and a number of other factors unique to each parent make the idea of parental variables less appealing than maternal and paternal factors. All the results above, both supportive and non-supportive, must be considered with caution due to the very small number of subjects. Additionally, other limitations of the study should be addressed before using any of these results to suggest meaningful relationships or lack thereof between parental factors and adolescent conflict.

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
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Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 23
investigation of these complex factors with changes in measurement and more precise scoring
may reveal relationships that were obscured in this study by several factors, including small
number of items in scales, self-reports, and a very small N.
RQ 2 inquired as to the level of relationship between adolescent perceptions of parental
attachment and family conflict. Two different methods of measurement (one for parents as a unit
and one for mother and father separately) indicated adolescent perception of parental attachment
as a strong predictor for family conflict. With improved measurement and a larger sample for
future studies, this result may be important to seeing discrepancies between parental attachment
style and adolescent perception of attachment style. Research has focused on attachment of
children, and to a lesser degree of the parental style. If perception of attachment is a stronger
indicator of conflict, than actual style, then further research is warranted.
Perceptions of paternal caring and overprotection were slightly stronger indicators of
family conflict than perceptions of maternal caring and overprotection. This reflects the
importance of separating adolescent research into the examination of the mother-child and
father-child relationship individually. Frequently, adolescents do not interact with their parents
as a familial unit but in a dyad with either mother or father. Differences in perspectives of
autonomy, attachment style, and a number of other factors unique to each parent make the idea
of parental variables less appealing than maternal and paternal factors.
All the results above, both supportive and non-supportive, must be considered with
caution due to the very small number of subjects. Additionally, other limitations of the study
should be addressed before using any of these results to suggest meaningful relationships or lack
thereof between parental factors and adolescent conflict.


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