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Effects of Parental Attachment Style and Parental Expectations on Family Conflict in Families with Adolescents
Unformatted Document Text:  Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 8 as parent, possibly resulting in a sense of loss or lack of potency (Dekovíc, 1999). This is one way in which a parental attitude or behavior might be one source of the family tension. Adolescents are easily frustrated when dealing with their parents because they do not expect to be heard or understood by a parent whose insecurity makes it hard to tune in accurately to adolescent perspectives and feelings. Since attachment style is directly related to the level of synchrony in the family (Chu & Powers, 1995), the nature of attachment style of parents is particularly significant. The mutual nature of the parent-child relationship may affect the nature of the attachment between the dyads. This, in turn, could influence the synchrony of family interaction during adolescence. Certainly, the adolescent alone should not be viewed as having control over attachment and synchrony patterns that follow certain normative developmental pathways. Bi-directional processes operate in a way that pulls behaviors from parents while pushing adolescents in certain ways (Pettit, Laird, Dodge, Bates, & Criss, 2001). A mutual influence model provides a way to consider the inextricably connected process of parent-child interaction. Just as adolescence has been examined from the perspective of examining the adolescent’s behaviors, attitudes, and physiology, the adolescent stage of a family can be investigated from a parental perspective. The mutual influence model suggests some of the ways in which parental difficulties during a child’s adolescence may contribute to conflict and problem behaviors (Ge et al., 1996; Molina & Chassin, 1996; Chu & Powers, 1995). These emphasize the interplay between family members in creating stressful interactions. There is some evidence to suggest that parents’ roles, attitudes, and behaviors may determine the quality of family interactions and adolescent interactions (Ge et al., 1996; Jang & Smith, 1997; Hock, et al.

Authors: Allen, Donna. and Rangarajan, Sripriya.
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Attachment and Family Influence on Adolescence 8
as parent, possibly resulting in a sense of loss or lack of potency (Dekovíc, 1999). This is one
way in which a parental attitude or behavior might be one source of the family tension.
Adolescents are easily frustrated when dealing with their parents because they do not expect to
be heard or understood by a parent whose insecurity makes it hard to tune in accurately to
adolescent perspectives and feelings. Since attachment style is directly related to the level of
synchrony in the family (Chu & Powers, 1995), the nature of attachment style of parents is
particularly significant. The mutual nature of the parent-child relationship may affect the nature
of the attachment between the dyads. This, in turn, could influence the synchrony of family
interaction during adolescence. Certainly, the adolescent alone should not be viewed as having
control over attachment and synchrony patterns that follow certain normative developmental
pathways. Bi-directional processes operate in a way that pulls behaviors from parents while
pushing adolescents in certain ways (Pettit, Laird, Dodge, Bates, & Criss, 2001). A mutual
influence model provides a way to consider the inextricably connected process of parent-child
interaction.
Just as adolescence has been examined from the perspective of examining the
adolescent’s behaviors, attitudes, and physiology, the adolescent stage of a family can be
investigated from a parental perspective. The mutual influence model suggests some of the ways
in which parental difficulties during a child’s adolescence may contribute to conflict and
problem behaviors (Ge et al., 1996; Molina & Chassin, 1996; Chu & Powers, 1995). These
emphasize the interplay between family members in creating stressful interactions. There is some
evidence to suggest that parents’ roles, attitudes, and behaviors may determine the quality of
family interactions and adolescent interactions (Ge et al., 1996; Jang & Smith, 1997; Hock, et al.


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