All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Feminist Consciousness and the Production of a Contemporary Women's Section
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking number: ICA-12-11416 13 Conceptualizing and constructing “contemporary” Frink also made it clear that as publisher he does not worry about the content of Savvy. He did, however, briefly talk about that content, describing the section in the same general manner that most of my interview subjects did – in opposition to “traditional” women’s sections. The idea is that this “contemporary” women’s section does not offer the same content a reader would find in women’s pages of the past. Managing editor Phil Haslanger, who began as a reporter for The Capital Times in 1973, said the plan was to focus on women, “but not in the traditional women’s sense – recipes and fashions – but talking about women’s issues in the workplace and with families and such. It was more savvy, I guess, to reflect contemporary women as opposed to women of the past.” When asked specifically to define Savvy, he again relied on a relational explanation: “It’s aimed at issues in women’s lives more than handy tips for living at home. That it tries to focus on issues women face in society, in the workplace, in their families, but less on a, less as a ‘Good Housekeeping’ sort of focus.” When asked to define “women’s news” in general, without hesitation Haslanger offered these examples: pay equity, harassment in the workplace, violence against women, breaking barriers, dealing with the stresses of juggling home, family and elder care, and women’s health issues like breast cancer. These stories clearly show the managing editor’s interest in offering serious news in Savvy. Amy Mertz, Savvy’s editor, takes a less specific and more reflective approach when defining “women’s news.” She said, Women and men have different biological and different kinds of instincts. Women seem to be a little more nurturing and it’s hard to not stereotype in that

Authors: Harp, Dustin.
first   previous   Page 14 of 29   next   last



background image
Tracking number: ICA-12-11416
13
Conceptualizing and constructing “contemporary”
Frink also made it clear that as publisher he does not worry about the content of
Savvy. He did, however, briefly talk about that content, describing the section in the same
general manner that most of my interview subjects did – in opposition to “traditional”
women’s sections. The idea is that this “contemporary” women’s section does not offer
the same content a reader would find in women’s pages of the past. Managing editor Phil
Haslanger, who began as a reporter for The Capital Times in 1973, said the plan was to
focus on women, “but not in the traditional women’s sense – recipes and fashions – but
talking about women’s issues in the workplace and with families and such. It was more
savvy, I guess, to reflect contemporary women as opposed to women of the past.” When
asked specifically to define Savvy, he again relied on a relational explanation: “It’s
aimed at issues in women’s lives more than handy tips for living at home. That it tries to
focus on issues women face in society, in the workplace, in their families, but less on a,
less as a ‘Good Housekeeping’ sort of focus.” When asked to define “women’s news” in
general, without hesitation Haslanger offered these examples: pay equity, harassment in
the workplace, violence against women, breaking barriers, dealing with the stresses of
juggling home, family and elder care, and women’s health issues like breast cancer.
These stories clearly show the managing editor’s interest in offering serious news in
Savvy. Amy Mertz, Savvy’s editor, takes a less specific and more reflective approach
when defining “women’s news.” She said,
Women and men have different biological and different kinds of instincts.
Women seem to be a little more nurturing and it’s hard to not stereotype in that


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.