All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Feminist Consciousness and the Production of a Contemporary Women's Section
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking number: ICA-12-11416 3 story” (p. 112). This “ghettoization” was seen as diminishing the worth a story and essentially saying the news was of no concern to men (Lont, 1995). Getting out of the “ghetto” During the 1960s and 1970s U.S. newspapers eliminated women’s sections. Feminist movement has been credited with bringing about this change. Guenin (1975) points out “women’s pages of American newspapers are changing, spurred by a variety of factors, not the least of which is the women’s equality movement” (p. 66). Yang (1996) wrote: “In the heyday of the women’s movement, newspapers transformed the traditional women’s pages into today’s unisex lifestyle sections” (p. 364). Miller (1976), through an inspection of content in 1965 women’s sections and 1975 lifestyle sections, examined content in the newly transformed sections. She sampled stories, advertisements and photographs during four separate weeks in 1965 and 1975 in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times. 4 She found that except for the New York Times, which substantially increased the amount of lifestyle and consumer coverage, “lifestyle editors have tended to replace traditional content with some form of entertainment” (p. 646). Miller also noted that within the lifestyle category, child rearing and activities for children had decreased the most. Further, she found that “despite their differing emphases on various topics, all four papers overwhelmingly focused on activities involving both men and women” (Miller, 1976, p. 645). Surprisingly, this fact seemed virtually unchanged since 1965 when the sections were designated for women. Finally, “The sections at all but the Post were dominated by photos of women, and even though roughly half the ads were pitched to both sexes, the other half were pitched to

Authors: Harp, Dustin.
first   previous   Page 4 of 29   next   last



background image
Tracking number: ICA-12-11416
3
story” (p. 112). This “ghettoization” was seen as diminishing the worth a story and
essentially saying the news was of no concern to men (Lont, 1995).
Getting out of the “ghetto”
During the 1960s and 1970s U.S. newspapers eliminated women’s sections.
Feminist movement has been credited with bringing about this change. Guenin (1975)
points out “women’s pages of American newspapers are changing, spurred by a variety of
factors, not the least of which is the women’s equality movement” (p. 66). Yang (1996)
wrote: “In the heyday of the women’s movement, newspapers transformed the traditional
women’s pages into today’s unisex lifestyle sections” (p. 364). Miller (1976), through an
inspection of content in 1965 women’s sections and 1975 lifestyle sections, examined
content in the newly transformed sections. She sampled stories, advertisements and
photographs during four separate weeks in 1965 and 1975 in the New York Times,
Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times.
4
She found that except for
the New York Times, which substantially increased the amount of lifestyle and consumer
coverage, “lifestyle editors have tended to replace traditional content with some form of
entertainment” (p. 646). Miller also noted that within the lifestyle category, child rearing
and activities for children had decreased the most. Further, she found that “despite their
differing emphases on various topics, all four papers overwhelmingly focused on
activities involving both men and women” (Miller, 1976, p. 645). Surprisingly, this fact
seemed virtually unchanged since 1965 when the sections were designated for women.
Finally, “The sections at all but the Post were dominated by photos of women, and even
though roughly half the ads were pitched to both sexes, the other half were pitched to


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.