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Violent Media Content: A Cross-Media, Longitundinal Analysis
Unformatted Document Text:  25 supported. The synopses for primetime television programs contained a larger percentage of violent content (M = 47.27%, SD = 27.30) than the newspaper stories (M = 16.91% violent, SD = 9.39), the newsmagazine stories (M = 14.73% violent, SD = 23.05), and the television news stories (M = 21.25% violent, SD = 10.81). The difference is statistically significant, F (3, 781) = 124.41, p < .001, and the Bonferroni test shows that the primetime television group differs from each of the other media groups. The second hypothesis received only minimal support. As stated immediately above, primetime television content contained significantly higher amounts of violence than the other types. However, although the mean percentage of violent content for television news was higher than for the print news sources (21.25% compared to 16.91% for newspapers and 14.73% for newsmagazines), the Bonferroni test indicates that this difference only approaches rather than meets traditional standards for statistical significance (p = .10). Additional analyses were conducted to determine whether the numbers of acts of violence differed by medium type, excluding primetime television from the analysis because of the reliance in that case on synopses rather than actual content. A one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc comparisons shows that all three remaining media type groups differed significantly regarding the numbers of physically violent acts against people per news story (see Table 2). Newspapers contained the largest number of such acts (M = 15.47, SD = 10.16), followed by television news (M = 11.84, SD = 10.43), and then newsmagazines (M = 7.61, SD = 11.59; F [2, 441] = 14.37, p < .001). Newspapers also contained significantly more instances of physical violence against objects, per story (M = 1.63, SD = 2.27), compared to newsmagazines (M = 1.24, SD =

Authors: Scharrer, Erica.
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supported. The synopses for primetime television programs contained a larger percentage
of violent content (M = 47.27%, SD = 27.30) than the newspaper stories (M = 16.91%
violent, SD = 9.39), the newsmagazine stories (M = 14.73% violent, SD = 23.05), and the
television news stories (M = 21.25% violent, SD = 10.81). The difference is statistically
significant, F (3, 781) = 124.41, p < .001, and the Bonferroni test shows that the
primetime television group differs from each of the other media groups. The second
hypothesis received only minimal support. As stated immediately above, primetime
television content contained significantly higher amounts of violence than the other types.
However, although the mean percentage of violent content for television news was higher
than for the print news sources (21.25% compared to 16.91% for newspapers and 14.73%
for newsmagazines), the Bonferroni test indicates that this difference only approaches
rather than meets traditional standards for statistical significance (p = .10).
Additional analyses were conducted to determine whether the numbers of acts of
violence differed by medium type, excluding primetime television from the analysis
because of the reliance in that case on synopses rather than actual content. A one-way
analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc comparisons shows that all three remaining
media type groups differed significantly regarding the numbers of physically violent acts
against people per news story (see Table 2). Newspapers contained the largest number of
such acts (M = 15.47, SD = 10.16), followed by television news (M = 11.84, SD =
10.43), and then newsmagazines (M = 7.61, SD = 11.59; F [2, 441] = 14.37, p < .001).
Newspapers also contained significantly more instances of physical violence against
objects, per story (M = 1.63, SD = 2.27), compared to newsmagazines (M = 1.24, SD =


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