All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 10 their positions and their ability to implement or perform under a new role configuration. Similarly, low LMX employees are likely to concentrate their information seeking efforts on supervisory expectations of their ability to perform effectively under a new role configuration. At the same time, due to the lack of trust and extended interactions, these employees are unlikely to engage in logrolling behaviors unless initiated by the supervisor. Thus, this study hypothesizes, H1: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are likely to report giving and seeking more information about ideas and plans than low quality LMX employees. H2: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are more likely to report using problem-solving behaviors than low quality LMX employees. Conversely, low quality LMX employees are more likely to report making simple requests than high quality LMX employees. H3: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are more likely to report engaging in logrolling behaviors than low quality LMX employees. The nature of the role change request is also an important influence on employee role change efforts (Miller et al., 1996; Zurcher, 1983). Supervisors’ expectations of employee tasks and functions that comprise a role can be categorized as pivotal, relevant, or peripheral (Schein, 1968). Pivotal role elements are those critical to task completion or even unit success, and failure to fulfill pivotal expectations is likely to result in disciplinary action. Relevant role elements, less critical to task or unit success, may afford employees with more discretion regarding the manner and timing of completion. Peripheral elements are tangential or picayune, and peripheral expectations can often be sidestepped with few consequences (Zurcher, 1983). As noted earlier, proposed role changes that significantly alter employees’ strategic mission and/or involve others in the role sets are likely to be viewed with caution by the supervisor and require a solid rationale, if for no other reason than the supervisor may have to justify the role change to others in the hierarchy (Katz & Kahn, 1978). Consequently, pivotal role changes are likely to be associated with a greater use of information giving, particularly with regard to the sharing of plans and ideas and justifications as well. However, it is unclear what impact the

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
first   previous   Page 10 of 38   next   last



background image
Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
10
their positions and their ability to implement or perform under a new role configuration. Similarly,
low LMX employees are likely to concentrate their information seeking efforts on supervisory
expectations of their ability to perform effectively under a new role configuration. At the same time,
due to the lack of trust and extended interactions, these employees are unlikely to engage in
logrolling behaviors unless initiated by the supervisor. Thus, this study hypothesizes,
H1: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are likely to report giving and
seeking more information about ideas and plans than low quality LMX employees.
H2: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are more likely to report using
problem-solving behaviors than low quality LMX employees. Conversely, low quality
LMX employees are more likely to report making simple requests than high quality LMX
employees.
H3: In successful role changes, high quality LMX employees are more likely to report engaging
in logrolling behaviors than low quality LMX employees.

The nature of the role change request is also an important influence on employee role
change efforts (Miller et al., 1996; Zurcher, 1983). Supervisors’ expectations of employee tasks and
functions that comprise a role can be categorized as pivotal, relevant, or peripheral (Schein, 1968).
Pivotal role elements are those critical to task completion or even unit success, and failure to fulfill
pivotal expectations is likely to result in disciplinary action. Relevant role elements, less critical to
task or unit success, may afford employees with more discretion regarding the manner and timing of
completion. Peripheral elements are tangential or picayune, and peripheral expectations can often be
sidestepped with few consequences (Zurcher, 1983).
As noted earlier, proposed role changes that significantly alter employees’ strategic mission
and/or involve others in the role sets are likely to be viewed with caution by the supervisor and
require a solid rationale, if for no other reason than the supervisor may have to justify the role
change to others in the hierarchy (Katz & Kahn, 1978). Consequently, pivotal role changes are
likely to be associated with a greater use of information giving, particularly with regard to the
sharing of plans and ideas and justifications as well. However, it is unclear what impact the


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 38   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.