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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 11 comparative lack of severity of the role change and potential loss of face (Goffman, 1961) for errors in supervisory permission for change would have on employee negotiation behavior. It is possible that proposed relevant and peripheral role changes may be associated with fewer information giving acts compared to pivotal role changes. Yet, in other cases, employees may have to go to great lengths to explain their case for a role change, investing in problem-solving behaviors over trivial matters given work circumstances (Zurcher, 1983). Therefore, this study asks, RQ2: What is the relationship between the importance of the requested role change and employees’ information giving behaviors? RQ3: What is the relationship between the quality of the LMX relationship and the nature of the requested role change? Role Negotiation Outcomes Two important outcomes of role negotiations are employee perceived ease of the role change attempt and their attitude toward the enacted role change. The ease of the role change may indicate the level of trust embedded in the supervisor-employee dyad (Graen & Scandura, 1987), the employee’s communication competencies (Jablin & Sias, 2001) in presenting information in a timely and sufficient manner, or both. Difficulty in the negotiation process may reflect the complexity of the proposed role change or the supervisor’s obstinacy (or wisdom, depending upon one’s perspective) and may impact employee willingness to attempt future role changes. In turn, employees’ attitude toward the role change may reflect their comfortableness with new responsibilities, the expected manner of task completion, or the extent of goal achievement. Employees may also be pleased with outcomes when they have maintained (and not harmed) the relationship quality with the supervisor (Lee & Jablin, 1995; Waldron, 1991) and affirmed that they can negotiate their roles (Miller et al., 1999). Yet, the need for change and effort tied to integrative problem solving behaviors may yield higher levels of satisfaction than those role changes that are minor or result from simple requests. Thus, this study asks,

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
11
comparative lack of severity of the role change and potential loss of face (Goffman, 1961) for errors
in supervisory permission for change would have on employee negotiation behavior. It is possible
that proposed relevant and peripheral role changes may be associated with fewer information giving
acts compared to pivotal role changes. Yet, in other cases, employees may have to go to great
lengths to explain their case for a role change, investing in problem-solving behaviors over trivial
matters given work circumstances (Zurcher, 1983). Therefore, this study asks,
RQ2: What is the relationship between the importance of the requested role change and
employees’ information giving behaviors?

RQ3: What is the relationship between the quality of the LMX relationship and the nature of the
requested role change?

Role Negotiation Outcomes
Two important outcomes of role negotiations are employee perceived ease of the role
change attempt and their attitude toward the enacted role change. The ease of the role change may
indicate the level of trust embedded in the supervisor-employee dyad (Graen & Scandura, 1987),
the employee’s communication competencies (Jablin & Sias, 2001) in presenting information in a
timely and sufficient manner, or both. Difficulty in the negotiation process may reflect the
complexity of the proposed role change or the supervisor’s obstinacy (or wisdom, depending upon
one’s perspective) and may impact employee willingness to attempt future role changes.
In turn, employees’ attitude toward the role change may reflect their comfortableness with
new responsibilities, the expected manner of task completion, or the extent of goal achievement.
Employees may also be pleased with outcomes when they have maintained (and not harmed) the
relationship quality with the supervisor (Lee & Jablin, 1995; Waldron, 1991) and affirmed that they
can negotiate their roles (Miller et al., 1999). Yet, the need for change and effort tied to integrative
problem solving behaviors may yield higher levels of satisfaction than those role changes that are
minor or result from simple requests. Thus, this study asks,


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