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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 13 Role Change Stimulus In order to help participants recall their role change experience, they were given instructions to describe: the aspect of their role that was changed, the reasons for the change, and any dialogue between themselves and their supervisor (see Appendix A). Participants were provided with a sheet of paper on which there were headings marked “You” and “Supervisor” in the margin to prompt participants’ reporting of their interaction during role negotiation. Survey Measures Quality of Leader-Member Exchange. The quality of the LMX relationship was measured from the subordinate’s perspective using the LMX-7 scale (Graen, Novack, & Sommerkamp, 1982), modified (Fairhurst et al., 1987) to a five point Likert scale where “strongly disagree”=1 and “strongly agree”=5. A confirmatory factor analysis (Hunter & Gerbing, 1982; Hunter & Hamilton, 1986) revealed ( χ 2 (21, N=65) = 3.30, p< .05, SSE > .05) the scale to be unidimensional with factor loadings ranging from .68 to .89, with a reliability of α= .91. To test Hypotheses 1-3, a mean split at 3.00 was computed to create high (n = 50) and low (n = 15) conditions. While the Mean (3.77) and Median (4.00) were considerably higher, the hypothetical Mean was selected to reflect the larger distribution in society (Graen & Scandura, 1987). A test between participants reporting and not reporting role negotiation details in the last six months on LMX revealed a significant difference between the two groups (t (134) = 2.98, p<.05). Specifically, the group reporting role negotiations were more likely to have a higher LMX score (M = 3.77) than those not reporting a role negotiation episode (M = 3.21). Nature of the Role Change. In an effort to determine the severity of the role change request, participants were asked on a forced choice measure to indicate how their supervisor viewed the role change. Responses were restricted to: “This change was related to the fundamental and critical aspects of my job;” “This change was related to fairly important, but not critical aspects of my job;”

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
13
Role Change Stimulus
In order to help participants recall their role change experience, they were given instructions
to describe: the aspect of their role that was changed, the reasons for the change, and any dialogue
between themselves and their supervisor (see Appendix A). Participants were provided with a sheet
of paper on which there were headings marked “You” and “Supervisor” in the margin to prompt
participants’ reporting of their interaction during role negotiation.
Survey Measures
Quality of Leader-Member Exchange. The quality of the LMX relationship was measured
from the subordinate’s perspective using the LMX-7 scale (Graen, Novack, & Sommerkamp, 1982),
modified (Fairhurst et al., 1987) to a five point Likert scale where “strongly disagree”=1 and
“strongly agree”=5. A confirmatory factor analysis (Hunter & Gerbing, 1982; Hunter & Hamilton,
1986) revealed (
χ
2
(21, N=65) = 3.30, p< .05, SSE > .05) the scale to be unidimensional with factor
loadings ranging from .68 to .89, with a reliability of
α=
.91. To test Hypotheses 1-3, a mean split at
3.00 was computed to create high (n = 50) and low (n = 15) conditions. While the Mean (3.77) and
Median (4.00) were considerably higher, the hypothetical Mean was selected to reflect the larger
distribution in society (Graen & Scandura, 1987). A test between participants reporting and not
reporting role negotiation details in the last six months on LMX revealed a significant difference
between the two groups (t (134) = 2.98, p<.05). Specifically, the group reporting role negotiations
were more likely to have a higher LMX score (M = 3.77) than those not reporting a role negotiation
episode (M = 3.21).
Nature of the Role Change. In an effort to determine the severity of the role change request,
participants were asked on a forced choice measure to indicate how their supervisor viewed the role
change. Responses were restricted to: “This change was related to the fundamental and critical
aspects of my job;” “This change was related to fairly important, but not critical aspects of my job;”


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