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An Analysis of Employees Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 14 and “This change was related to rather insignificant aspects of my job.” In keeping with Schein (1968), these responses were labeled pivotal, relevant, and peripheral, respectively. Negotiation Behaviors. The negotiation behaviors were measured using a modified coding scheme adapted from Jordan and Roloff (1997) and Tutzauer and Roloff (1988). The content of the dialogue in the surveys were analyzed and divided into units of analysis called statements. For the purpose of this study, a statement was an idea, answer, question, or suggestion. Anything that indicated a pause, end of sentence, or shift in topic, conversation, or behavior was the beginning of a new statement. Each turn could include more than one statement (e.g., a subordinate who gives an answer followed by a question would be two statements). While the negotiating portion of the survey was formatted in a repetitive vertical list to encourage the reporting of speaking turns (e.g. “You” and “Supervisor”), some participants reported the role change in a paragraph form which included descriptions of the scenario as well as passive interaction dialogue (e.g. “My supervisor was very supportive of the idea” versus the supervisor saying “That is a good idea”). The paragraph descriptions were coded into statements using the portions of the report that indicated or implied passive dialogue during the negotiation versus the descriptive and narrative portions. The coding procedure was divided into six steps. 4 First, the statements were unitized. Second, the dialogues were reviewed to separate utterances that were work-related (e.g., evaluative work and descriptive work; Hudson & Jablin, 1992) from general conversations that were not work-related. Third, the dialogues were read through once to identify information giving statements and then again to identify information seeking statements. Information giving statements were evaluative or descriptive work utterances designated as proclamations, informing, or an answer to a question. Information seeking statements were evaluative or descriptive work queries targeted at the supervisor. Any statements that were not information giving or seeking (i.e., not directly related to information exchange or negotiation

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
14
and “This change was related to rather insignificant aspects of my job.” In keeping with Schein
(1968), these responses were labeled pivotal, relevant, and peripheral, respectively.
Negotiation
Behaviors. The negotiation behaviors were measured using a modified coding
scheme adapted from Jordan and Roloff (1997) and Tutzauer and Roloff (1988). The content of the
dialogue in the surveys were analyzed and divided into units of analysis called statements. For the
purpose of this study, a statement was an idea, answer, question, or suggestion. Anything that
indicated a pause, end of sentence, or shift in topic, conversation, or behavior was the beginning of
a new statement. Each turn could include more than one statement (e.g., a subordinate who gives an
answer followed by a question would be two statements). While the negotiating portion of the
survey was formatted in a repetitive vertical list to encourage the reporting of speaking turns (e.g.
“You” and “Supervisor”), some participants reported the role change in a paragraph form which
included descriptions of the scenario as well as passive interaction dialogue (e.g. “My supervisor
was very supportive of the idea” versus the supervisor saying “That is a good idea”). The paragraph
descriptions were coded into statements using the portions of the report that indicated or implied
passive dialogue during the negotiation versus the descriptive and narrative portions. The coding
procedure was divided into six steps.
4
First, the statements were unitized. Second, the dialogues were reviewed to separate
utterances that were work-related (e.g., evaluative work and descriptive work; Hudson & Jablin,
1992) from general conversations that were not work-related. Third, the dialogues were read
through once to identify information giving statements and then again to identify information
seeking statements. Information giving statements were evaluative or descriptive work utterances
designated as proclamations, informing, or an answer to a question. Information seeking statements
were evaluative or descriptive work queries targeted at the supervisor. Any statements that were
not information giving or seeking (i.e., not directly related to information exchange or negotiation


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