All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 15 processes) were coded into Miscellaneous. Fourth, the subordinates’ information giving and information seeking statements were further analyzed to determine if the information was (a) introducing plans or ideas for change, (b) defending or justifying the subordinate’s ability to perform, (c) building trust and/or a positive relationship, or (d) other (see Table 1 for examples). Fifth, following Jordon and Roloff’s (1997) example of coding a series of negotiation statements, participants’ role change dialogues were subsequently coded as a simple request or problem-solving behavior. A simple request was defined as an episode where the subordinate’s initial proposal was accepted by the supervisor with minimal effort (e.g., Subordinate: “I would like to change the design of the linen room”, Supervisor: “Go for it.”) and without elaborate discussion of the proposed idea or plan. Simple requests did not require collaborative efforts to overcome conflicting interests or the discussion of alternative options. In a problem-solving episode the supervisor and subordinate worked together to reach a solution that was beneficial to both parties and the organization (Pruitt, 1983). Problem-solving included: (a) detailed discussion about the rationale and implementation strategies of the plan, (b) discussion and evaluation of potential outcomes, (c) consideration of possible alternatives, and/or (d) modification to ideas or plans following input from supervisor. Sixth, the dialogues were reanalyzed for evidence of logrolling behaviors. Logrolling was defined as trade-offs or yielding on issues of low-priority for gains on high priority issues (Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). Following the coding of all reported episodes, miscellaneous statements were disregarded. Sixty-five role negotiation episodes produced 347 statements from subordinate’s dialogues. Supervisory statements (n = 256) were not included in this study. For the purposes of assessing reliabilities, a primary coder coded all of the reported episodes and unitized statements. A secondary coder recoded 19 dialogues (29% of the sample) and 111 statements (32% of total subordinate statements). A third coder resolved any disagreements between the first two coders.

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
first   previous   Page 15 of 38   next   last



background image
Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
15
processes) were coded into Miscellaneous. Fourth, the subordinates’ information giving and
information seeking statements were further analyzed to determine if the information was (a)
introducing plans or ideas for change, (b) defending or justifying the subordinate’s ability to
perform, (c) building trust and/or a positive relationship, or (d) other (see Table 1 for examples).
Fifth, following Jordon and Roloff’s (1997) example of coding a series of negotiation
statements, participants’ role change dialogues were subsequently coded as a simple request or
problem-solving behavior. A simple request was defined as an episode where the subordinate’s
initial proposal was accepted by the supervisor with minimal effort (e.g., Subordinate: “I would like
to change the design of the linen room”, Supervisor: “Go for it.”) and without elaborate discussion
of the proposed idea or plan. Simple requests did not require collaborative efforts to overcome
conflicting interests or the discussion of alternative options. In a problem-solving episode the
supervisor and subordinate worked together to reach a solution that was beneficial to both parties
and the organization (Pruitt, 1983). Problem-solving included: (a) detailed discussion about the
rationale and implementation strategies of the plan, (b) discussion and evaluation of potential
outcomes, (c) consideration of possible alternatives, and/or (d) modification to ideas or plans
following input from supervisor. Sixth, the dialogues were reanalyzed for evidence of logrolling
behaviors. Logrolling was defined as trade-offs or yielding on issues of low-priority for gains on
high priority issues (Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). Following the coding of all reported
episodes, miscellaneous statements were disregarded.
Sixty-five role negotiation episodes produced 347 statements from subordinate’s dialogues.
Supervisory statements (n = 256) were not included in this study. For the purposes of assessing
reliabilities, a primary coder coded all of the reported episodes and unitized statements. A
secondary coder recoded 19 dialogues (29% of the sample) and 111 statements (32% of total
subordinate statements). A third coder resolved any disagreements between the first two coders.


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 15 of 38   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.