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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 16 Reliability of coding as determined by Cohen’s kappa was .89, with 95% agreement for information giving ideas/plans, 88% agreement for information giving justification, 100% agreement for information giving rapport, 86% agreement for information seeking ideas/plans, and 95% agreement for miscellaneous statements. Reliabilities for problem-solving versus simple requests as well as for logrolling were Cohen’s kappa = 1.00 (100% agreement). Role Negotiation Outcomes. To gauge participant’s self-reported success in obtaining their desired role change and to assess how their roles changed since the reported role negotiation episode, participants responded to five scale items, using five point scales ranging from 1 = low to 5 = high. Items asked (a) how easy it was to get their supervisors to agree to role changes like the one they provided here, (b) the degree of change experienced in the strategic purpose of their job within the last six months, (c) the degree of change experienced in the manner of performing tasks in the last six months, (d) their satisfaction with role change, and (e) the extent they were successful in negotiating what they wanted in the role change. Background Information. Using Jablin’s (1982) organizational status measure with “1=top” and “5=bottom,” 5% of participants were in the top fifth of the hierarchy, 14% were in the second fifth, 49% in the middle of the hierarchy, 24% in the next to bottom fifth, and 8% in the bottom of the hierarchy. Participants were also asked to report information on their sex, their supervisor’s sex, and length (i.e., months) of employment. Results Research Question One inquired into subordinate’s reported use of various communicative acts associated with role negotiation. As reported in Table 1, out of 347 statements reported by participants, 246 (71%) were identified as information giving acts, 24 (7%) were information seeking statements, and 77 (22%) were miscellaneous statements ( χ 2 (2, N = 65) = 64.42, p<.0001). Participants did not report seeking justifications or rapport.

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
16
Reliability of coding as determined by Cohen’s kappa was .89, with 95% agreement for information
giving ideas/plans, 88% agreement for information giving justification, 100% agreement for
information giving rapport, 86% agreement for information seeking ideas/plans, and 95%
agreement for miscellaneous statements. Reliabilities for problem-solving versus simple requests as
well as for logrolling were Cohen’s kappa = 1.00 (100% agreement).
Role Negotiation Outcomes. To gauge participant’s self-reported success in obtaining their
desired role change and to assess how their roles changed since the reported role negotiation
episode, participants responded to five scale items, using five point scales ranging from 1 = low to 5
= high. Items asked (a) how easy it was to get their supervisors to agree to role changes like the one
they provided here, (b) the degree of change experienced in the strategic purpose of their job within
the last six months, (c) the degree of change experienced in the manner of performing tasks in the
last six months, (d) their satisfaction with role change, and (e) the extent they were successful in
negotiating what they wanted in the role change.
Background Information. Using Jablin’s (1982) organizational status measure with “1=top”
and “5=bottom,” 5% of participants were in the top fifth of the hierarchy, 14% were in the second
fifth, 49% in the middle of the hierarchy, 24% in the next to bottom fifth, and 8% in the bottom of
the hierarchy. Participants were also asked to report information on their sex, their supervisor’s sex,
and length (i.e., months) of employment.
Results
Research Question One inquired into subordinate’s reported use of various communicative
acts associated with role negotiation. As reported in Table 1, out of 347 statements reported by
participants, 246 (71%) were identified as information giving acts, 24 (7%) were information
seeking statements, and 77 (22%) were miscellaneous statements (
χ
2
(2, N = 65) = 64.42, p<.0001).
Participants did not report seeking justifications or rapport.


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