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An Analysis of Employees Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 19 Participants reported considerable variability in how easy it was to get their supervisors to agree to role changes like the one they provided here (M = 3.32), the degree of change experienced in the strategic purpose of their job within the last six months (M = 2.93), the degree of change experienced in the manner of performing tasks in the last six months (M = 3.00), their satisfaction with role change (M = 3.27), and the extent they were successful in negotiating what they wanted in the role change (M = 3.33). Due to the limited number of participants and unequal distribution across cells, tests for interactions were not advisable (Hays, 1981). Consequently, a series of one-way analysis of variance were conducted. In terms of the impact of relationship quality on role outcomes, analyses revealed that high LMX employees (M = 3.64) reported greater ease in getting their supervisor to agree with the proposed role change (F (1,62) = 34.57, p<.0001, η 2 = .36) than low LMX employees (M = 2.21). Significant main effects were not present for LMX on participant reported success, satisfaction with the role change, change in the strategic purpose of their job, or change in the manner of performing their job. With regard to the influence of the pivotal, relevant, or peripheral nature of the role change on role outcomes, analyses revealed that those requesting and accomplishing pivotal and relevant role changes reported their supervisors as more difficult to gain agreement (M = 3.43, M = 3.48, respectively; F (1,59) = 3.40, p<.04, η 2 = .10) than those with peripheral agreements (M = 2.67). Those accomplishing pivotal role changes reported greater strategic change in their roles (M = 3.22; F (1,59) = 3.22, p<.05, η 2 = .10) than those with relevant (M = 3.00) and peripheral (M = 2.42) changes. Likewise, pivotal role changes were associated with change in the manner of performing the role (M = 3.91; F (1,59) = 5.19, p<.008, η 2 = .15) than those with relevant (M = 2.96) and peripheral (M = 2.42) changes, and pivotal changes were associated with greater satisfaction with the role change (M = 3.74; F (1,59) = 6.34, p<.003, η 2 = .18) than those with relevant (M = 3.22)

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
19
Participants reported considerable variability in how easy it was to get their supervisors to agree to
role changes like the one they provided here (M = 3.32), the degree of change experienced in the
strategic purpose of their job within the last six months (M = 2.93), the degree of change
experienced in the manner of performing tasks in the last six months (M = 3.00), their satisfaction
with role change (M = 3.27), and the extent they were successful in negotiating what they wanted in
the role change (M = 3.33).
Due to the limited number of participants and unequal distribution across cells, tests for
interactions were not advisable (Hays, 1981). Consequently, a series of one-way analysis of
variance were conducted. In terms of the impact of relationship quality on role outcomes, analyses
revealed that high LMX employees (M = 3.64) reported greater ease in getting their supervisor to
agree with the proposed role change (F (1,62) = 34.57, p<.0001,
η
2
= .36) than low LMX employees
(M = 2.21). Significant main effects were not present for LMX on participant reported success,
satisfaction with the role change, change in the strategic purpose of their job, or change in the
manner of performing their job.
With regard to the influence of the pivotal, relevant, or peripheral nature of the role change
on role outcomes, analyses revealed that those requesting and accomplishing pivotal and relevant
role changes reported their supervisors as more difficult to gain agreement (M = 3.43, M = 3.48,
respectively; F (1,59) = 3.40, p<.04,
η
2
= .10) than those with peripheral agreements (M = 2.67).
Those accomplishing pivotal role changes reported greater strategic change in their roles (M = 3.22;
F (1,59) = 3.22, p<.05,
η
2
= .10) than those with relevant (M = 3.00) and peripheral (M = 2.42)
changes. Likewise, pivotal role changes were associated with change in the manner of performing
the role (M = 3.91; F (1,59) = 5.19, p<.008,
η
2
= .15) than those with relevant (M = 2.96) and
peripheral (M = 2.42) changes, and pivotal changes were associated with greater satisfaction with
the role change (M = 3.74; F (1,59) = 6.34, p<.003,
η
2
= .18) than those with relevant (M = 3.22)


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