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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 2 An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes Employees are thought to be continually modifying their roles to suit their needs, abilities, and desires (Jablin, 2001; Schein, 1968, 1971). One form of modification, role negotiation, involves the exchange of information leading to a revision of supervisory expectations of subordinate roles and behaviors (Miller, Jablin, Casey, Lamphear-Vanhorn, & Ethington, 1996). These information exchanges are characterized by the giving and seeking of information, building upon shared interests, modifying initially proposed positions, and developing a co-orientation or agreement on the nature and manner of the role change (Miller et al., 1996). Role negotiation represents an active form of adjustment, or role-making (Graen, 1976; Graen & Scandura, 1987) where employees move beyond received roles (Katz & Kahn, 1978) and attempt to alter the expectations of members of their role set. As a primarily overt communication act, role negotiation involves the management of conversation, facework, persuasion, and at times bargaining (Jablin, 2001; Miller et al., 1996). These superior-subordinate information exchanges focus on roles and their enactments, which are the fundamental building block of social systems (Katz & Kahn, 1978), the source of considerable stress and discussion (Ilgen & Hollenbeck, 1991), and the foci of upward influence attempts and conflict management (Jablin, 2001). Despite its importance to employee adjustment and role development, with few exceptions (e.g., Ashford & Black, 1996; Miller, Johnson, Hart, & Peterson, 1999) research to date largely overlooks both communicative aspects and contexts of role negotiation efforts. Even less is known about elemental negotiation behaviors such as information seeking, information giving, problem- solving, and logrolling (e.g. Jordan & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) during role change attempts. As knowledge of communication behaviors associated with successful role changes might be very helpful to both employees and upper management, this study considers how negotiation contexts such as the perceived quality of the supervisor-subordinate relationship and

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
2
An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Employees are thought to be continually modifying their roles to suit their needs, abilities,
and desires (Jablin, 2001; Schein, 1968, 1971). One form of modification, role negotiation,
involves the exchange of information leading to a revision of supervisory expectations of
subordinate roles and behaviors (Miller, Jablin, Casey, Lamphear-Vanhorn, & Ethington, 1996).
These information exchanges are characterized by the giving and seeking of information, building
upon shared interests, modifying initially proposed positions, and developing a co-orientation or
agreement on the nature and manner of the role change (Miller et al., 1996).
Role negotiation represents an active form of adjustment, or role-making (Graen, 1976;
Graen & Scandura, 1987) where employees move beyond received roles (Katz & Kahn, 1978) and
attempt to alter the expectations of members of their role set. As a primarily overt communication
act, role negotiation involves the management of conversation, facework, persuasion, and at times
bargaining (Jablin, 2001; Miller et al., 1996). These superior-subordinate information exchanges
focus on roles and their enactments, which are the fundamental building block of social systems
(Katz & Kahn, 1978), the source of considerable stress and discussion (Ilgen & Hollenbeck, 1991),
and the foci of upward influence attempts and conflict management (Jablin, 2001).
Despite its importance to employee adjustment and role development, with few exceptions
(e.g., Ashford & Black, 1996; Miller, Johnson, Hart, & Peterson, 1999) research to date largely
overlooks both communicative aspects and contexts of role negotiation efforts. Even less is known
about elemental negotiation behaviors such as information seeking, information giving, problem-
solving, and logrolling (e.g. Jordan & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) during
role change attempts. As knowledge of communication behaviors associated with successful role
changes might be very helpful to both employees and upper management, this study considers how
negotiation contexts such as the perceived quality of the supervisor-subordinate relationship and


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