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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 20 and peripheral (M = 2.58) changes. Those accomplishing pivotal (M = 3.65) and relevant (M = 3.48) role changes reported greater success in achieving their goals (F (1,59) = 7.26, p<.002, η 2 = .20) than those with peripheral (M = 2.42) changes. Results indicated that a significant main effect was present in the enactment of problem- solving versus simple role requests on participants’ satisfaction with the role change (F (1,62) = 4.56, p<.04, η 2 = .07). Employees engaging in problem-solving behaviors were more satisfied (M = 3.65) than those who made simple requests (M = 3.09). Analyses also indicated that employees who enacted problem-solving were more likely to report a greater change in the manner of performing their job (M=3.35; F (1,62) = 4.56, p<.04, η 2 = .07) than those who made simple requests (M = 2.84). Discussion While it is generally believed that communicative behaviors are vital, even necessary, for successful change in individual’s jobs and work settings (Graen & Scandura, 1987; Ilgen & Hollenbeck, 1991; Katz & Khan, 1978; Wrzesniewshi & Dutton, 2001), few studies explore the communication behaviors surrounding role change or contributing to successful role changes (Jablin, 2001). This study examines oft glossed-over details of communication related to role change. While results from the study should be viewed cautiously due to their exploratory nature and the limited sample of reported role episodes, the study extends insights from negotiation behavior research (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) and illuminates selective aspects of communication within the role-making process (Graen, 1976; Graen & Scandura, 1987). Role Negotiation Behaviors Scholarly works on negotiation, particularly on interactions during bargaining between buyers and sellers (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1981; Pruitt & Lewis, 1975; Tutzauer, 1992; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) identify a number of communicative behaviors such as information

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
20
and peripheral (M = 2.58) changes. Those accomplishing pivotal (M = 3.65) and relevant (M =
3.48) role changes reported greater success in achieving their goals (F (1,59) = 7.26, p<.002,
η
2
=
.20) than those with peripheral (M = 2.42) changes.
Results indicated that a significant main effect was present in the enactment of problem-
solving versus simple role requests on participants’ satisfaction with the role change (F (1,62) =
4.56, p<.04,
η
2
= .07). Employees engaging in problem-solving behaviors were more satisfied (M =
3.65) than those who made simple requests (M = 3.09). Analyses also indicated that employees who
enacted problem-solving were more likely to report a greater change in the manner of performing
their job (M=3.35; F (1,62) = 4.56, p<.04,
η
2
= .07) than those who made simple requests (M =
2.84).
Discussion
While it is generally believed that communicative behaviors are vital, even necessary, for
successful change in individual’s jobs and work settings (Graen & Scandura, 1987; Ilgen &
Hollenbeck, 1991; Katz & Khan, 1978; Wrzesniewshi & Dutton, 2001), few studies explore the
communication behaviors surrounding role change or contributing to successful role changes
(Jablin, 2001). This study examines oft glossed-over details of communication related to role
change. While results from the study should be viewed cautiously due to their exploratory nature
and the limited sample of reported role episodes, the study extends insights from negotiation
behavior research (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) and illuminates selective
aspects of communication within the role-making process (Graen, 1976; Graen & Scandura, 1987).
Role Negotiation Behaviors
Scholarly works on negotiation, particularly on interactions during bargaining between
buyers and sellers (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1981; Pruitt & Lewis, 1975; Tutzauer, 1992;
Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988) identify a number of communicative behaviors such as information


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