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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 21 sharing and integrative procedures (e.g., problem-solving, logrolling, expanding the pie) that are associated with greater joint gains and satisfaction among participants. Indeed, this body of research sets forth a template for exploring negotiations of all sorts within organizational settings. In comparison to current negotiation and bargaining studies, this study’s methodology is elemental. For some time now, scholars investigating exchanges in interpersonal and financially related bargaining and negotiations commonly consider hundreds or thousands of statements, interaction patterns between participants, and strategies emerging from dialogue (e.g., Bazerman & Lewicki, 1983; Jordan & Roloff, 1997; Putnam, 1985; Putnam & Jones, 1982; Pruitt & Lewis, 1975; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). These investigations are aided by transcripts of interactions and limited topics at times set within a time frame and often from an experimental laboratory setting. In contrast, this investigation relies on the recall of participants who provided information on an interaction that took place up to six months previously. However, the neglect of communication behaviors associated with role change (Jablin, 2001) and even the potential value of rather broad, inexact conversational recalls in this case balances methodological disadvantages anticipated by Stafford & Daly (1984). Within the confines of these limitations, this study provides important insights into employee role negotiation behaviors. Moving away from the narrowly defined salary or personal disputes associated with many organizational bargaining and conflict investigations, this research explores episodes affecting work processes and other employees. A particularly compelling set of findings from this study concerns the quantity of information giving statements, particularly with regard to giving ideas and plans for change reported across role episodes. Information exchange is a hallmark of integrative agreements (Pruitt, 1983), and it behooves employees to provide information on the parameters of the change and its rationale and to respond to any concerns expressed by their supervisor (Miller et al., 1996). As would be expected in episodes characterized as problem-solving, employees provide more ideas and

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
21
sharing and integrative procedures (e.g., problem-solving, logrolling, expanding the pie) that are
associated with greater joint gains and satisfaction among participants. Indeed, this body of research
sets forth a template for exploring negotiations of all sorts within organizational settings.
In comparison to current negotiation and bargaining studies, this study’s methodology is
elemental. For some time now, scholars investigating exchanges in interpersonal and financially
related bargaining and negotiations commonly consider hundreds or thousands of statements,
interaction patterns between participants, and strategies emerging from dialogue (e.g., Bazerman &
Lewicki, 1983; Jordan & Roloff, 1997; Putnam, 1985; Putnam & Jones, 1982; Pruitt & Lewis,
1975; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). These investigations are aided by transcripts of interactions and
limited topics at times set within a time frame and often from an experimental laboratory setting. In
contrast, this investigation relies on the recall of participants who provided information on an
interaction that took place up to six months previously. However, the neglect of communication
behaviors associated with role change (Jablin, 2001) and even the potential value of rather broad,
inexact conversational recalls in this case balances methodological disadvantages anticipated by
Stafford & Daly (1984). Within the confines of these limitations, this study provides important
insights into employee role negotiation behaviors. Moving away from the narrowly defined salary
or personal disputes associated with many organizational bargaining and conflict investigations, this
research explores episodes affecting work processes and other employees.
A particularly compelling set of findings from this study concerns the quantity of
information giving statements, particularly with regard to giving ideas and plans for change
reported across role episodes. Information exchange is a hallmark of integrative agreements (Pruitt,
1983), and it behooves employees to provide information on the parameters of the change and its
rationale and to respond to any concerns expressed by their supervisor (Miller et al., 1996). As
would be expected in episodes characterized as problem-solving, employees provide more ideas and


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