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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 22 plans than in episodes characterized as making simple requests. Employees engaging in problem- solving also seek information from their supervisors regarding these ideas and plans than those making simple requests. Problem-solving may be the most appropriate tactic when role issues are complicated, others (i.e., role set members) are affected, the rationale or strategy for implementation requires explication, alternative actions must be weighed, and/or others must sign off on the idea or plan. Indeed, participants whose role change efforts were characterized as problem-solving report greater change in the manner of performing their jobs compared to those who make simple requests. Similarly, employees seeking pivotal role changes were more likely to engage in problem-solving while those employees seeking relevant role change were more likely to make simple requests. Pivotal changes, which alter the strategic nature of the role change (Schein, 1968), may affect other unit members’ core responsibilities and be difficult to reverse if the change does not succeed. Overall, the need for co-orientation when seeking role modifications and its importance to individuals and their units forms an important link between negotiation research (Pruitt, 1983, 1981; Putnam, 1985; Putnam & Poole, 1987; Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer, 1992) and role research (Graen & Scandura, 1987; Ilgen & Hollenbeck, 1991; Jablin, 2001; Kahn et al., 1964; Katz & Kahn, 1978). Data capturing efforts to modify organizational roles can provide researchers with a fertile and important range of issues that parties have high interest in settling amicably and quickly. Role-making Graen & Scandura (1987) posit that in role-making supervisors and subordinates define the nature of their dyadic relationship and reveal how they will behave in problematic situations. The role-making process aptly describes employee “individualization” and/or modification of their roles during their assimilation into the organization (e.g., Jablin, 1982; Fairhurst, 2001). While role- making can offer a critical framework for understanding employees actions and adjustments, with few exceptions (e.g., Zurcher, 1983) relatively scant details exist regarding how employees modify

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
22
plans than in episodes characterized as making simple requests. Employees engaging in problem-
solving also seek information from their supervisors regarding these ideas and plans than those
making simple requests. Problem-solving may be the most appropriate tactic when role issues are
complicated, others (i.e., role set members) are affected, the rationale or strategy for implementation
requires explication, alternative actions must be weighed, and/or others must sign off on the idea or
plan. Indeed, participants whose role change efforts were characterized as problem-solving report
greater change in the manner of performing their jobs compared to those who make simple requests.
Similarly, employees seeking pivotal role changes were more likely to engage in problem-solving
while those employees seeking relevant role change were more likely to make simple requests.
Pivotal changes, which alter the strategic nature of the role change (Schein, 1968), may affect other
unit members’ core responsibilities and be difficult to reverse if the change does not succeed.
Overall, the need for co-orientation when seeking role modifications and its importance to
individuals and their units forms an important link between negotiation research (Pruitt, 1983, 1981;
Putnam, 1985; Putnam & Poole, 1987; Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer, 1992) and role research
(Graen & Scandura, 1987; Ilgen & Hollenbeck, 1991; Jablin, 2001; Kahn et al., 1964; Katz & Kahn,
1978). Data capturing efforts to modify organizational roles can provide researchers with a fertile
and important range of issues that parties have high interest in settling amicably and quickly.
Role-making
Graen & Scandura (1987) posit that in role-making supervisors and subordinates define the
nature of their dyadic relationship and reveal how they will behave in problematic situations. The
role-making process aptly describes employee “individualization” and/or modification of their roles
during their assimilation into the organization (e.g., Jablin, 1982; Fairhurst, 2001). While role-
making can offer a critical framework for understanding employees actions and adjustments, with
few exceptions (e.g., Zurcher, 1983) relatively scant details exist regarding how employees modify


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