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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 23 their roles and even less is known regarding its communication elements. While narrow in scope, several important initial indicators emerge from this investigation. As an initial observation, it is interesting to note that two-thirds of participants in this sample make simple requests targeted at relevant role changes while a greater proportion of problem- solving interactions aim at pivotal role changes. Still, there are instances of employees making successful simple requests for pivotal and peripheral changes as well as employees successfully engaging in problem-solving to achieve relevant and peripheral role change. These findings suggest that role negotiations should be conceived very broadly to accommodate a simple request and ascent with little or no prior ground work as well as a protracted (e.g., over several weeks) and possibly difficult information exchanges. It is also evident that over half of the initial sample did not experience a successful role change negotiation in the last six months, although it is unclear if the lack of negotiated changes is indicative of their overall work experience. For instance, some participants not reporting a role negotiation episode indicated that their most recent successful role negotiation was six months past. Others reported that they were in the midst of role negotiations. For the majority of participants not reporting role negotiation episodes, it is not known whether the others had successfully modified their roles through role negotiation or secondary adjustments, were in jobs that fit their needs and did not require adjustments, whether their supervisors were not receptive to role negotiations, or they had failed to achieve “success” in their negotiation efforts. With regard to LMX relationship status, the mutual trust and support (Fairhurst & Chandler, 1989), common internal goals, mutual influence (Fairhurst, 2001), and considerable social exchanges provide high LMX employees’ (Linden et al., 1993) considerable advantages in role negotiations. For instance, participants report greater ease in getting their supervisor to agree to their role change goals, perhaps an outcome of their considerable supervisory access. In contrast, a lack of trust and support plus shortcomings perceived by their supervisors (Fairhurst, 2001; Linden

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
23
their roles and even less is known regarding its communication elements. While narrow in scope,
several important initial indicators emerge from this investigation.
As an initial observation, it is interesting to note that two-thirds of participants in this sample
make simple requests targeted at relevant role changes while a greater proportion of problem-
solving interactions aim at pivotal role changes. Still, there are instances of employees making
successful simple requests for pivotal and peripheral changes as well as employees successfully
engaging in problem-solving to achieve relevant and peripheral role change. These findings suggest
that role negotiations should be conceived very broadly to accommodate a simple request and
ascent with little or no prior ground work as well as a protracted (e.g., over several weeks) and
possibly difficult information exchanges. It is also evident that over half of the initial sample did not
experience a successful role change negotiation in the last six months, although it is unclear if the
lack of negotiated changes is indicative of their overall work experience. For instance, some
participants not reporting a role negotiation episode indicated that their most recent successful role
negotiation was six months past. Others reported that they were in the midst of role negotiations.
For the majority of participants not reporting role negotiation episodes, it is not known whether the
others had successfully modified their roles through role negotiation or secondary adjustments, were
in jobs that fit their needs and did not require adjustments, whether their supervisors were not
receptive to role negotiations, or they had failed to achieve “success” in their negotiation efforts.
With regard to LMX relationship status, the mutual trust and support (Fairhurst & Chandler,
1989), common internal goals, mutual influence (Fairhurst, 2001), and considerable social
exchanges provide high LMX employees’ (Linden et al., 1993) considerable advantages in role
negotiations. For instance, participants report greater ease in getting their supervisor to agree to
their role change goals, perhaps an outcome of their considerable supervisory access. In contrast, a
lack of trust and support plus shortcomings perceived by their supervisors (Fairhurst, 2001; Linden


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