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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 25 employees, could improve subordinates’ relationship standing and result in supervisors being more open and trusting. Alternatively, success in negotiating and performing their roles could lead some subordinates to become more goal-oriented, more knowledgeable of the social work environment, and emboldened to negotiate other aspects of their role. Workplace Implications Negotiation is a chief means to achieve coordination and trust between opposing parties and to gain jointly beneficial outcomes (Pruitt, 1983; Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). As employees seek to modify or change their roles in the workplace, it is vital that they understand role negotiation to be a viable means to attain their desired role change. Role negotiation even holds promise for low LMX employees as this study indicates that low LMX employees can successfully negotiate their roles. Several issues, however, should be considered by parties seeking to negotiate their roles. Simple requests and problem-solving are both potential negotiation paths to attain successful role changes. Yet, even in simple requests, a minimal explanation of the rationale for the change, how to implement the change, and how related issues could be handled to everyone’s benefit are likely to figure prominently in the immediate supervisor’s mind. Problem-solving is likely to entail more elaborate discussion of details and implementation strategies, including alternative options and trade-offs. Such information may provide sufficient details for the supervisor so that the needs of the employee and work unit can be met. In this sense, information giving and seeking form the foundation to negotiations (Fisher & Ury, 1981; Pruitt, 1983, 1981). Integrative agreements, particularly problem-solving, depend on supervisors and subordinates acquiring and disclosing information sufficient enough in scope so the desired role change can be seen in relation to unit needs and the function of other role set members. While considerable emphasis has been given to employee information seeking in recent years (e.g., Ashford & Black, 1996), researchers and

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
25
employees, could improve subordinates’ relationship standing and result in supervisors being more
open and trusting. Alternatively, success in negotiating and performing their roles could lead some
subordinates to become more goal-oriented, more knowledgeable of the social work environment,
and emboldened to negotiate other aspects of their role.
Workplace Implications
Negotiation is a chief means to achieve coordination and trust between opposing parties and
to gain jointly beneficial outcomes (Pruitt, 1983; Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer & Roloff,
1988). As employees seek to modify or change their roles in the workplace, it is vital that they
understand role negotiation to be a viable means to attain their desired role change. Role negotiation
even holds promise for low LMX employees as this study indicates that low LMX employees can
successfully negotiate their roles.
Several issues, however, should be considered by parties seeking to negotiate their roles.
Simple requests and problem-solving are both potential negotiation paths to attain successful role
changes. Yet, even in simple requests, a minimal explanation of the rationale for the change, how to
implement the change, and how related issues could be handled to everyone’s benefit are likely to
figure prominently in the immediate supervisor’s mind. Problem-solving is likely to entail more
elaborate discussion of details and implementation strategies, including alternative options and
trade-offs. Such information may provide sufficient details for the supervisor so that the needs of
the employee and work unit can be met. In this sense, information giving and seeking form the
foundation to negotiations (Fisher & Ury, 1981; Pruitt, 1983, 1981). Integrative agreements,
particularly problem-solving, depend on supervisors and subordinates acquiring and disclosing
information sufficient enough in scope so the desired role change can be seen in relation to unit
needs and the function of other role set members. While considerable emphasis has been given to
employee information seeking in recent years (e.g., Ashford & Black, 1996), researchers and


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