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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 26 organization practitioners should also focus on employees’ information giving skills so they can learn to provide detailed information and respond to supervisors’ queries and alternative suggestions. In terms of achieving pivotal role changes, employees’ information giving and seeking skills may be particularly crucial. Pivotal changes that alter the strategic nature of the role, may have a profound impact on the unit, and, as suggested by this study, are associated with problem-solving behaviors and considerable information giving and seeking. Those seeking pivotal changes may need to discuss: who will be affected by the role change; who (other than supervisor) will partake in the decision making process; the potential costs/benefits to the subordinate, supervisor, co-workers, and organization; and the anticipated time for and process of implementation. Unsolicited comments from several participants in this study not reporting dialogues suggest their supervisor would never listen to their ideas. While these remarks come from the employees’ perspective, organizations might consider encouraging their managers to be more open to employee ideas and suggestions for role change. Supervisors could be trained in listening skills as well as the use of negotiation tactics that would benefit themselves, the employee, and the organization as a whole. In other cases, as one conversation between the researcher and a supervisor of participating employees suggests, at times employees need to be more assertive and persistent in their role change requests. Limitations To gather data on employee role negotiation episodes as opposed to an artificial laboratory setting, this study relies on participants’ recall of the conversations with their supervisors. Further, the mode of collecting the data is written rather than oral. As Stafford and Daly (1984) indicate, the total amount of details recalled using a written mode is significantly lower than when using an oral mode, due to hindrances of the free-flow of ideas that may occur in actual conversations. Akin to

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
26
organization practitioners should also focus on employees’ information giving skills so they can
learn to provide detailed information and respond to supervisors’ queries and alternative
suggestions.
In terms of achieving pivotal role changes, employees’ information giving and seeking skills
may be particularly crucial. Pivotal changes that alter the strategic nature of the role, may have a
profound impact on the unit, and, as suggested by this study, are associated with problem-solving
behaviors and considerable information giving and seeking. Those seeking pivotal changes may
need to discuss: who will be affected by the role change; who (other than supervisor) will partake in
the decision making process; the potential costs/benefits to the subordinate, supervisor, co-workers,
and organization; and the anticipated time for and process of implementation.
Unsolicited comments from several participants in this study not reporting dialogues suggest
their supervisor would never listen to their ideas. While these remarks come from the employees’
perspective, organizations might consider encouraging their managers to be more open to employee
ideas and suggestions for role change. Supervisors could be trained in listening skills as well as the
use of negotiation tactics that would benefit themselves, the employee, and the organization as a
whole. In other cases, as one conversation between the researcher and a supervisor of participating
employees suggests, at times employees need to be more assertive and persistent in their role
change requests.
Limitations
To gather data on employee role negotiation episodes as opposed to an artificial laboratory
setting, this study relies on participants’ recall of the conversations with their supervisors. Further,
the mode of collecting the data is written rather than oral. As Stafford and Daly (1984) indicate, the
total amount of details recalled using a written mode is significantly lower than when using an oral
mode, due to hindrances of the free-flow of ideas that may occur in actual conversations. Akin to


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