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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 27 interpersonal communication research, participants may be more likely to recall the details of their supervisors’ contribution to the conversation than their own (Stafford & Daly, 1984), thereby decreasing reports of their own information giving and seeking behaviors. On a related note, the importance of the change to the participant might also influence the amount of recalled information so that pivotal or possibly more beneficial (e.g., profitable, stress-relieving) changes would be recalled to a greater degree compared to other changes. Future research would be well-served to pursue actual recordings of role change conversations or gather additional information on negotiations through interviews following survey completion. Such detailed data may shed greater insight into employees’ use of logrolling behaviors, which may not have been accessed by participants’ written reports. While role negotiation episodes reported by participants include recalled information of participants’ and supervisors’ conversations, only the partcipants’ contributions are coded and analyzed. The coding of their information giving, seeking, problem-solving or simple requests, and logrolling behaviors provides insights into employees’ mindset, but the influence of supervisors prompting and/or directing conversations on the role change is absent. Future research should seek to assess both supervisor and subordinate information exchange and negotiation behaviors to identify their impact on employee communicative behaviors during their role episodes. Analyses of the data are also limited due to the number of low quality LMX participants. The comparably small number of low LMX participants reporting role negotiation episodes produces a restricted range of responses, especially in the low LMX by problem-solving cell. Future research should seek to obtain equal numbers of high and low quality LMX participants. Finally, this study limits the allotted time (i.e., within the last six months) for reporting a past role change. Due to this time restraint, some participants do not report role changes occurring six months prior. It is important to note that a defining role modification may have occurred before

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
27
interpersonal communication research, participants may be more likely to recall the details of their
supervisors’ contribution to the conversation than their own (Stafford & Daly, 1984), thereby
decreasing reports of their own information giving and seeking behaviors. On a related note, the
importance of the change to the participant might also influence the amount of recalled information
so that pivotal or possibly more beneficial (e.g., profitable, stress-relieving) changes would be
recalled to a greater degree compared to other changes. Future research would be well-served to
pursue actual recordings of role change conversations or gather additional information on
negotiations through interviews following survey completion. Such detailed data may shed greater
insight into employees’ use of logrolling behaviors, which may not have been accessed by
participants’ written reports.
While role negotiation episodes reported by participants include recalled information of
participants’ and supervisors’ conversations, only the partcipants’ contributions are coded and
analyzed. The coding of their information giving, seeking, problem-solving or simple requests, and
logrolling behaviors provides insights into employees’ mindset, but the influence of supervisors
prompting and/or directing conversations on the role change is absent. Future research should seek
to assess both supervisor and subordinate information exchange and negotiation behaviors to
identify their impact on employee communicative behaviors during their role episodes.
Analyses of the data are also limited due to the number of low quality LMX participants.
The comparably small number of low LMX participants reporting role negotiation episodes
produces a restricted range of responses, especially in the low LMX by problem-solving cell. Future
research should seek to obtain equal numbers of high and low quality LMX participants.
Finally, this study limits the allotted time (i.e., within the last six months) for reporting a
past role change. Due to this time restraint, some participants do not report role changes occurring
six months prior. It is important to note that a defining role modification may have occurred before


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