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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 28 these parameters, a modification that may reduce employees’ need to engage in role-making. Alternatively, a major role change may have occurred outside the time frame of the study, and that change may have resulted in employees seeking comparatively minor changes (e.g., simple requests) in the current study. Thus, researchers should consider collecting data longitudinally to assess such possibilities. Future Research Future research should consider the degree of complexity or associated issues inherent in the sought role change. The reasons that subordinates enact problem-solving or simple requests could depend on what individual(s) will be affected by the role change, others who must assent to the role change or participate in the decision making process, and/or whether the role change will be immediate or is introduced over a period of time. Using surveys or interviews to uncover these details would provide greater insight into individuals’ negotiating style. Researchers should also consider the complexity of the communication exchanges in role negotiation episodes. Information on supervisors cues, tone of voice, quickness of responses, and the like could provide a more thorough understanding of exchanges during role negotiations. Future research should also evaluate subordinates’ and supervisors’ negotiating ability. Individuals vary in their communication skills and savvy in enacting those skills (Jablin & Sias, 2001). Researchers should examine participants’ negotiation abilities to determine, for example, if simple requests are offered (versus problem-solving) due to stressful circumstances, complex role relationships, or negotiator personality orientations (Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). In sum, role negotiation is an effective means for employees to modify or change their roles. Through role negotiation, employees can effectively add or lessen their workload, contribute creative and innovative ideas and plans, and participate in the decision making process determining

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
28
these parameters, a modification that may reduce employees’ need to engage in role-making.
Alternatively, a major role change may have occurred outside the time frame of the study, and that
change may have resulted in employees seeking comparatively minor changes (e.g., simple
requests) in the current study. Thus, researchers should consider collecting data longitudinally to
assess such possibilities.
Future Research
Future research should consider the degree of complexity or associated issues inherent in the
sought role change. The reasons that subordinates enact problem-solving or simple requests could
depend on what individual(s) will be affected by the role change, others who must assent to the role
change or participate in the decision making process, and/or whether the role change will be
immediate or is introduced over a period of time. Using surveys or interviews to uncover these
details would provide greater insight into individuals’ negotiating style. Researchers should also
consider the complexity of the communication exchanges in role negotiation episodes. Information
on supervisors cues, tone of voice, quickness of responses, and the like could provide a more
thorough understanding of exchanges during role negotiations.
Future research should also evaluate subordinates’ and supervisors’ negotiating ability.
Individuals vary in their communication skills and savvy in enacting those skills (Jablin & Sias,
2001). Researchers should examine participants’ negotiation abilities to determine, for example, if
simple requests are offered (versus problem-solving) due to stressful circumstances, complex role
relationships, or negotiator personality orientations (Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Tutzauer & Roloff,
1988).
In sum, role negotiation is an effective means for employees to modify or change their roles.
Through role negotiation, employees can effectively add or lessen their workload, contribute
creative and innovative ideas and plans, and participate in the decision making process determining


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