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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 6 of joint agreements. Parties polarize or present plans constructed with incomplete information. A collaborative approach, characterized by the exchange of information and willingness to accept trade-offs, increases the likelihood of joint agreements (Pruitt & Lewis, 1975). Parties have greater opportunities to construct positions leading to successful negotiations when informed of the other’s needs and rationale. In an effort to explore communicative behaviors associated with role negotiation, this study examines behaviors considered prominent in successful negotiations: information giving, information seeking, logrolling, and problem-solving (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). Information exchange refers to the giving and seeking of information between two parties to ascertain salient issues, to locate areas for trade-offs, and to assign meaning to the others’ actions (Putnam, 1985). Information exchange is thought to be critical in the achievement of integrative agreements (i.e. agreements that reconcile both parties’ interests yielding joint benefit as opposed to agreements forced upon one party). According to Pruitt (1981), information exchange and subsequent insights lead to integrative agreements only when bargainers believe that each member is concerned with the needs of the opponent. Carnevale, Pruitt, and Seilheimer (1981) posit that the exchange of information about values and priorities allows negotiators to think simultaneously about both parties’ welfare. Employees give evaluative and descriptive work information in order to establish or solicit reciprocity, identify positions, and inform the other party about expectations. 1 Key information to be shared in role negotiations includes the nature of the proposed role (e.g., ideas, plans), its rationale, how others will be impacted, and the employee’s ability to perform effectively in the new role configuration (e.g., justifying ability to handle new responsibilities). Fisher and Ury (1981) suggest giving information in general to clarify misunderstandings, to identify future accomplishments, and to reveal the specific desires and concerns of interests that motivate

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
6
of joint agreements. Parties polarize or present plans constructed with incomplete information. A
collaborative approach, characterized by the exchange of information and willingness to accept
trade-offs, increases the likelihood of joint agreements (Pruitt & Lewis, 1975). Parties have greater
opportunities to construct positions leading to successful negotiations when informed of the other’s
needs and rationale. In an effort to explore communicative behaviors associated with role
negotiation, this study examines behaviors considered prominent in successful negotiations:
information giving, information seeking, logrolling, and problem-solving (Jordon & Roloff, 1997;
Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988).
Information exchange refers to the giving and seeking of information between two parties to
ascertain salient issues, to locate areas for trade-offs, and to assign meaning to the others’ actions
(Putnam, 1985). Information exchange is thought to be critical in the achievement of integrative
agreements (i.e. agreements that reconcile both parties’ interests yielding joint benefit as opposed to
agreements forced upon one party). According to Pruitt (1981), information exchange and
subsequent insights lead to integrative agreements only when bargainers believe that each member
is concerned with the needs of the opponent. Carnevale, Pruitt, and Seilheimer (1981) posit that the
exchange of information about values and priorities allows negotiators to think simultaneously
about both parties’ welfare.
Employees give evaluative and descriptive work information in order to establish or solicit
reciprocity, identify positions, and inform the other party about expectations.
1
Key information to
be shared in role negotiations includes the nature of the proposed role (e.g., ideas, plans), its
rationale, how others will be impacted, and the employee’s ability to perform effectively in the new
role configuration (e.g., justifying ability to handle new responsibilities). Fisher and Ury (1981)
suggest giving information in general to clarify misunderstandings, to identify future
accomplishments, and to reveal the specific desires and concerns of interests that motivate


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