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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 7 negotiation. Moreover, most reviews of negotiation research (e.g., Roloff, 1987; Putnam & Roloff, 1992; Pruitt, 1981) underline the importance of sharing information about goals and values as a necessary step toward integrative outcomes. Employees seek information from their supervisors prior to and during role negotiation episodes in order to learn their role expectations and attitude toward possible role changes. At the most basic level, employees seek information by asking questions to generate responses from the other party (Fisher & Ury, 1981). In role negotiations, employees may seek supervisory feedback regarding their ideas, rationale, or ability to perform. Seeking information leads to insight into others’ priorities, creating the opportunity for integrative outcomes and subsequent satisfaction with negotiations (Pruitt and Lewis, 1975; Tutzauer and Roloff, 1988). Logrolling refers to the trading off or yielding issues of low-priority for gains on high priority issues (Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). Tutzauer (1992) reports that trade-offs achieved through logrolling leads to mutually beneficial settlements. Miller et al. (1996) suggest that maternity leavetakers through logrolling may sacrifice something of high value (e.g., guarantees of returning to the same position) to gain other values (e.g., a longer maternity leave). However, the awareness of others’ needs, self-monitoring, and a willingness to abandon narrow positions may be critical to successful logrolling efforts (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1981). A particularly important communicative aspect of role negotiation concerns making simple role-change requests or engaging in problem-solving behaviors. Simple requests are fitting when employees seek minor changes in their roles, expect little opposition to their request, and/or are solidifying their responsibility for tasks that they are already performing. Alternatively, problem- solving behavior may be appropriate when change requests involve role set members, equally preferred alternatives exist, the situation is complex, and/or an innovative solution is required. Problem-solving is central to integrative approaches to negotiation, by reconciling interests and

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
7
negotiation. Moreover, most reviews of negotiation research (e.g., Roloff, 1987; Putnam & Roloff,
1992; Pruitt, 1981) underline the importance of sharing information about goals and values as a
necessary step toward integrative outcomes.
Employees seek information from their supervisors prior to and during role negotiation
episodes in order to learn their role expectations and attitude toward possible role changes. At the
most basic level, employees seek information by asking questions to generate responses from the
other party (Fisher & Ury, 1981). In role negotiations, employees may seek supervisory feedback
regarding their ideas, rationale, or ability to perform. Seeking information leads to insight into
others’ priorities, creating the opportunity for integrative outcomes and subsequent satisfaction with
negotiations (Pruitt and Lewis, 1975; Tutzauer and Roloff, 1988).
Logrolling refers to the trading off or yielding issues of low-priority for gains on high
priority issues (Pruitt, 1983; Tutzauer & Roloff, 1988). Tutzauer (1992) reports that trade-offs
achieved through logrolling leads to mutually beneficial settlements. Miller et al. (1996) suggest
that maternity leavetakers through logrolling may sacrifice something of high value (e.g.,
guarantees of returning to the same position) to gain other values (e.g., a longer maternity leave).
However, the awareness of others’ needs, self-monitoring, and a willingness to abandon narrow
positions may be critical to successful logrolling efforts (Jordon & Roloff, 1997; Pruitt, 1981).
A particularly important communicative aspect of role negotiation concerns making simple
role-change requests or engaging in problem-solving behaviors. Simple requests are fitting when
employees seek minor changes in their roles, expect little opposition to their request, and/or are
solidifying their responsibility for tasks that they are already performing. Alternatively, problem-
solving behavior may be appropriate when change requests involve role set members, equally
preferred alternatives exist, the situation is complex, and/or an innovative solution is required.
Problem-solving is central to integrative approaches to negotiation, by reconciling interests and


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